hydrogen fluoride


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Related to hydrogen fluoride: Oxygen fluoride

hydrogen fluoride

HF, a colorless corrosive gas used in industry as a source of fluorine and of hydrofluoric acid. See: fluorine; hydrofluoric acid
See also: fluoride
References in periodicals archive ?
The addition explained that local substitution for liquid hydrogen fluoride is already underway and that there was greater need to find a substitute for gas hydrogen fluoride, for which Korea has greater dependency from overseas suppliers.
Once again, the hydrogen fluoride is orthogonally oriented with respect to the internuclear axis of ethylene, such as have been also verified by Aldrich and collaborators [109] in studies involving the hydrochloride acid.
The concentrations of fluoride ions as determined by IC after aging are indicative of refrigerant decomposition except in the case of potassium fluoride and potassium hydrogen fluoride where the concentrations of fluoride may have come from the process chemicals rather than possible refrigerant decomposition.
In terms of reaction mechanism, hydrogen fluoride, at purification temperatures up to 150 [degrees]C binds onto alumina by:
Potassium Hydrogen Fluoride, Polyoxyethylene Nonylphenyl Ether, Potassium Hexafluoroaluminate and Triethanolamine Borate have similar changes to the controls at both concentrations and both temperatures.
Total emissions of hydrogen fluoride (HF) -- a noxious gas that evolves from the electrolysis process -- were contained at 0.60 kg/t Al.
Sumner, "Hydrogen fluoride effects on plasma membrane composition, ATPase activity and cell structure in needles of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) seedlings," Trees, vol.
* Hydrogen fluoride. Hydrofluoric acid is a fuming liquid that boils at 19.5[degrees]C.
With that in mind, some of the newer suppliers have been establishing manufacturing positions further back in the value chain (e.g., fluorocarbons such as R22, hydrogen fluoride, and fluorspar - the mineral from which the fluorine atom is obtained).
The detectors "see" the four dangerous gases - carbon monoxide, hydrogen fluoride, nitric oxide, ozone - given off during welding operations.
Among the toxics covered in the proposed rule for existing plants are mercury, lead, arsenic, chromium, cadmium, nickel, antimony, beryllium, manganese, hydrogen chloride (HC1), hydrogen fluoride (HF), dioxins, and furans.
With regard to disposal of used gas remaining in the process, COF2 is decomposed by hydrolysis into hydrogen fluoride (HF) - which is easy to dispose of - and CO2.