hydrogen bond

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bond

 [bond]
the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the symbol representing this linkage and indicating the number and attachment of the valencies of an atom in constitutional formulas, represented by a pair of dots or a line between atoms, e.g., H—O—H, H—C≡C—H or H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.
coordinate covalent bond a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond), or three pairs of electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond a strong covalent bond, —S—S—, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of the oxidation of the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high-energy phosphate bond an energy-rich phosphate linkage present in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine, and certain other biological molecules. On hydrolysis at pH 7 it yields about 8000 calories per mole, in contrast to the 3000 calories yielded by phosphate esters. The bond stores energy that is used to drive biochemical processes, such as the synthesis of macromolecules, contraction of muscles, and the production of the electrical potentials for nerve conduction.
high-energy sulfur bond an energy-rich sulfur linkage, the most important of which occurs in the acetyl-CoA molecule, the main source of energy in fatty acid biosynthesis.
hydrogen bond a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element (such as oxygen or nitrogen) in a given molecule, or part of a molecule, and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or in a different part of the same molecule.
ionic bond a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a positive and the other a negative charge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond the —CO—NH— linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is an amide linkage joining amino acids to form peptides.

hy·dro·gen bond

a bond arising from the sharing of a hydrogen atom, covalently bound to a strongly electronegative element (for example, N, O, or a halogen), with another strongly electronegative element (for example, N, O, or a halogen). In substances of biologic importance, the most common hydrogen bonds are those in which H links N to O or N; such bonds link purines on one strand to pyrimidines on the other strand of nucleic acids, thus maintaining double-stranded structures as in the Watson-Crick helix.

hy·dro·gen bond

(hī'drō-jen bond)
A bond arising from the sharing of a hydrogen atom, covalently bound to an electronegative element (e.g., N or O), with another electronegative element (e.g., N, O, or a halogen).

hydrogen bond

A bond in which a hydrogen atom is shared by two other atoms. The hydrogen is more firmly attached to one of these (which is called the hydrogen donor) than to the other (which is called the hydrogen acceptor). The acceptor has a relative negative charge, and, as unlike charges attract each other, a bond is formed to the hydrogen atom. Hydrogen bonds are weak and easily broken but occur extensively in biomolecules. The link between the bases in the two chains of DNA are hydrogen bonds. Adenine links to thymine by two hydrogen bonds, and guanine links to cytosine by three hydrogen bonds.

hydrogen bond

the attractive force between the hydrogen atom of one molecule and another molecule forming a noncovalent bond. These weak bonds are relevant to the biological function of particular compounds, being formed in the secondary structure of proteins and between complementary base pairs in NUCLEIC ACIDS.
References in periodicals archive ?
: Consequently, it would not be unexpected that the support ing matrix and a small sample thickness could alter both the position and amplitude of the hydrogen bonding stretching and libration bands.
A similar endothermic peak value was also reported by Zeng, Fang [26] and Chuang, Young [27], which was at 179.4AdegC and 180AdegC respectively, it was identified as the dissociation process of interchain hydrogen bonding of chitosan.
Then the MAn-g-IIR was modified with ATA to form thermoreversible crosslinking MAn-g-IIR via multiple hydrogen bonding arrays same as Fig.
So, we choose 1-octanoic acid as the solvent in order to change the self-assembly of DBT by the hydrogen bonding between the DBT molecules and the 1-octanoic acids.
Reimann (1962-present) Structural and spectroscopic properties of transition metal complexes involving a variety of co-ordinate and hydrogen bonding arrangements creating unique environments.
We also found that covalent bonding of the treatment chemical to silica is preferred to just associative, i.e., hydrogen bonding. The best candidates are coupling agents such as silanes which can give efficient incorporation during coagulation then render additional service during vulcanization.
The CSO2C asymmetrical stretch peak shifted slightly to 1322.19cm-1, 1319.36cm-1, and 1327.22cm-1, respectively, caused by hydrogen bonding. The C-O asymmetric stretch peak (wave number 1260-1000cm-1) moved to 986.67cm-1, 991.28cm-1 and 996.24cm-1 caused by hydrogen bond shifted.
The structures showed how hydrogen atoms are arranged in the active site of xylanase, where they move and how hydrogen bonding is altered due to pH changes and ligand binding.
These phenomena seem to be associated with the formation of hydrogen bonding; for example, the time evolution of G' during isothermal annealing has been attributed to it [2], However, the microstructural changes occurring during the annealing or heating/cooling are not as yet well-understood.
Because both hydrogen bonding interactions and vdW dispersion forces are expected to play important roles in determining the crystal structure of cellulose, the proper inclusion of long-range interactions in the geometric optimization is necessary.
The structure of the binary complex of the enzyme and glutathione indicates that the hydroxyl group of Tyr6 is located between 3.2 A and 3.5 A from the sulfur of glutathione, well within hydrogen bonding distance.
To test hydrogen bonding's role, Kool and his colleagues looked at how a molecule impersonating thymine affected DNA polymerase's ability to make DNA.