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Related to hydrogen bomb: Cobalt bomb, neutron bomb

hydrogen

 (H) [hi´dro-jen]
a chemical element, atomic number 1, atomic weight 1.00797. (See Appendix 6.) It exists as the mass 1 isotope (protium, or light or ordinary hydrogen), mass 2 isotope (deuterium, heavy hydrogen), and mass 3 isotope (tritium).
hydrogen cyanide an extremely poisonous colorless liquid or gas, HCN, a decomposition product of various naturally occurring glycosides and a common cause of cyanide poisoning. Inhalation of the gas can cause death within a minute. Called also hydrocyanic acid.
heavy hydrogen deuterium.
hydrogen ion concentration the degree of concentration of hydrogen ions (the acid element) in a solution. Its symbol is pH, and it expresses the degree to which a solution is acidic or alkaline. The pH range extends from 0 to 14, pH 7 being neutral, a pH of less than 7 indicating acidity, and one above 7 indicating alkalinity. See also acid-base balance.
hydrogen peroxide H2O2, an antiseptic with a mildly antibacterial action. A 3 per cent solution foams on touching skin or mucous membrane and appears to have a mechanical cleansing action.
hydrogen sulfide H2S, a poisonous gas with an offensive smell, released from decaying organic material, natural gas, petroleum, and sulfur deposits, and sometimes used as a chemical reagent.

hy·dro·gen (H),

(hī'drō-jen),
1. A gaseous element, atomic no. 1, atomic wt. 1.00794.
2. The molecular form (H2) of the element. Synonym(s): dihydrogen
[hydro- + G. -gen, producing]

hy·dro·gen

(H) (hī'drō-jen)
1. A gaseous element, atomic no. 1, atomic wt. 1.00794.
2. The molecular form of the element, H2.
Synonym(s): dihydrogen.
[hydro- + G. -gen, producing]

Hydrogen

The simplest, most common element known in the universe. It is composed of a single electron (negatively charged particle) circling a nucleus consisting of a single proton (positively charged particle). It is the nuclear proton of hydrogen that makes MRI possible by reacting resonantly to radio waves while aligned in a magnetic field.

hy·dro·gen

(hī'drō-jen)
1. Gaseous element, atomic no. 1, atomic wt. 1.00794.
2. Molecular form (H2) of the element.
[hydro- + G. -gen, producing]
References in periodicals archive ?
North Korea jolted major world leaders when it carried out the strongest of its six-ever nuclear tests in early September, claiming to have used a hydrogen bomb.
North Korea's state media said the country's leader Kim Jong Un had inspected the loading of a hydrogen bomb into a new intercontinental ballistic missile.
Other nations also condemned the hydrogen bomb test.
One expert said the size of Sunday's detonation meant it was possible it could be a hydrogen bomb test.
There was no independent confirmation that the detonation was a hydrogen bomb, rather than a less powerful atomic device, but Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said Tokyo could not rule out such a possibility.
The explosion of a hydrogen bomb "could potentially shake up the security landscape of Northeast Asia and fundamentally change the nature f of the North Korean nuclear threat," said South Korean President Park Geun-Hye.
In a press statement, Al-Zayani said that the hydrogen bomb test was a violation of international law, stressing that the GCC was in support of all efforts to prevent the spread of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMDs).
Ci"This is the second retaliation of the South since North Korea announced the hydrogen bomb test," - said the agency.
The US defence establishment, meanwhile, dismissed the explosion as something not stemmed from a Hydrogen Bomb, citing its relatively-low power.
The South's presidential office made the announcement on Thursday, a day after the North claimed to have carried out its first hydrogen bomb test.
CLAIMS by North Korea that it conducted a hydrogen bomb test have been met by worldwide condemnation - and doubt.
A hydrogen bomb test which North Korea claimed it has conducted is a "provocation" and a "grave breach" of UN Security Council resolutions, Philip Hammond said.