hydrodensitometry

un·der·wat·er weigh·ing

(ŭn'dĕr-waw'tĕr wā'ing)
Assessment of body volume by measuring a person's weight in air and again under water; loss of scale weight (corrected for water density) equals body volume. Body density (body mass:volume ratio) is then used to compute percent body fat.
Synonym(s): densitometry, hydrodensitometry, hydrostatic weighing.

hydrodensitometry

(hi?dro-den?si-tom'e-tre)
The weighing of an object immersed in water and subsequent measurement of the water displaced. The specific gravity of the body can be estimated from that information, and the percentage of the body fat can be estimated.
See: lean body mass
References in periodicals archive ?
Hydrodensitometry and anthropometric measurements were done in the Human Body Composition Laboratory, at the School of Nutrition and Dietetics from the University of Antioquia, Medellin, Colombia.
In the current study and in consideration of our sample size, use of a lab-based objective reference method of assessment of body composition such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and/or hydrodensitometry [169] was not plausible, and hence, we used a multifrequency bioelectrical impedance body composition analyzer with an advanced functionality to measure percentage body fat, for which the validity and clinical usefulness was demonstrated in previous studies [170, 171].
(34.) Williams CA,BaleP.Bias and limits of agreement between hydrodensitometry, bioelectrical impedance and skinfold calipers measures of percentage body fat.
The methods arising from the chemical model are popular due to hydrodensitometry be the first technique known body analysis.
Determination of body composition: A comparison of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and hydrodensitometry. Am J Clin Nutr.
Comparison of three bioimpedance techniques with hydrodensitometry for assessment of body composition in young adult women
Body composition measurement: a review of hydrodensitometry, antropometry, and impedance methods.
Other techniques such as hydrodensitometry, plethysmography, dilution techniques, total body count, neutron activation analysis, dual X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), computed tomography, and magnetic resonance are difficult to perform due to multiple causes, such as the need of specialized personnel, high costs, and difficulties in patient transport.
[5] Other measures, generally limited to the research setting, include electrical impedance techniques, hydrodensitometry (underwater weighing), computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.
Comparison of body composition assessment by bioimpedance versus hydrodensitometry in women 38 to 60 years old from Medellin-Colombia
Hutcheon, "Body composition measurement: a review of hydrodensitometry, anthropometry, and impedance methods," Nutrition, vol.