cement

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cement

 [se-ment´]
1. a substance that produces a solid union between two surfaces.
dental cement any of various bonding substances that are placed in the mouth as a viscous liquid and set to a hard mass; used in restorative and orthodontic dental procedures as luting (cementing) agents, as protective, insulating, or sedative bases, and as restorative materials.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ce·ment

(sē-ment'), [TA]
1. A layer of bonelike, mineralized tissue covering the dentin of the root and neck of a tooth that anchors the fibers of the periodontal ligament. Synonym(s): cementum [TA]
2. In dentistry, a nonmetallic material used for luting, filling, or permanent or temporary restorative purposes, made by mixing components into a plastic mass that sets, or as an adherent sealer in attaching various dental restorations in or on the tooth.
[L. caementum, rough quarry stone, fr. caedo, to cut]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cement

(sĭ-mĕnt′)
n.
1. Dentistry A substance used for filling cavities or anchoring crowns, inlays, or other restorations.
2. Variant of cementum.
v. ce·mented, ce·menting, ce·ments

ce·ment′er n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cement

Dentistry Any of a number of bonding materials used in cavities and restorations
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ce·ment

(sĕ-ment') [TA]
1. To affix two surfaces.
2. Material to make a structure adhere to another.
3. dentistry A nonmetallic material used for luting, filling, or permanent or temporary restoration, or as an adherent sealer in attaching various dental restorations in or on the tooth made by mixing components into a plastic mass that sets.
[L. caementum, rough quarry stone, fr. caedo, to cut]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cement

the spongy bone-like substance surrounding the roots of mammalian teeth, which contains COLLAGEN-like fibres to absorb shock and which assists in holding the teeth in sockets. Part of the enamel of the crown of the teeth in some mammals, e.g. ungulates, is also covered by cement.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

ce·ment

(sĕ-ment') [TA]
1. In dentistry, nonmetallic material used for luting, filling, or permanent or temporary restorative purposes, made by mixing components into a plastic mass that sets, or as an adherent sealer in attaching various dental restorations in or on the tooth.
Synonym(s): cementum [TA] .
2. A layer of bonelike, mineralized tissue covering dentin of root and neck of a tooth that anchors fibers of the periodontal ligament.
[L. caementum, rough quarry stone, fr. caedo, to cut]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
To evaluate the effect of the remaining moisture of KA, the cores prepared with each KA type were pulverized and their densities were measured according to KS L 5110 "testing method for specific gravity of hydraulic cement."
Recently research was performed to investigate the feasibility of WA as a partial replacement of hydraulic cement in concrete production.
Meeting ASTM International C115 7 as a hydraulic cement system, it is accepted by industry standards, codes, and rating systems including the American Concrete Institute (ACI), International Code Council (ICC), and United States Green Building Council (USGBC), according to the company.
I used hydraulic cement to fill a large gap in our foundation wall that was allowing ants to get into the house.
Large voids and missing bricks need to be filled with hydraulic cement so the liner has something to press up against.
"These mixtures achieved a compressive strength around 5,000 psi in 28 days and had properties similar to those of conventional hydraulic cement concrete in terms of compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture, splitting tensile strength, permeability, resistance to cycles of freezing and thawing, and acceptance."
I mixed up a batch of hydraulic cement, stuck a handful over the leak and held it there for a couple of minutes until it hardened.
Applicators often attempt to stop leaks by localized swiping of hydraulic cement or other similar methods.
The standard spotlights colloidal silica, which "could increase the durability of hydraulic cement concrete to resist the nature of physical and chemical attack over time," according to Jon Belkowitz, vice president of Intelligent Concrete LLC, a Freehold, N.J., consultancy.
Hydraulic cement works great for patching holes in a foundation because it can set up even under water, and it expands as it sets to seal the hole and lock the plug in place.