hydrastis


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hy·dras·tis

(hī-dras'tis),
The dried rhizome of Hydrastis canadensis (family Ranunculaceae), native to eastern U.S.; formerly used to treat chronic catarrhal states of the mucous membranes and in metrorrhagia.
[Mod. L. fr. G. hydōr (hydro-), water, + draō, to accomplish]
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparative analysis of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) population re-growth following human harvest: implications for conservation.
INCI: Origanum vulgare leaf extract, thynms vulgaris (thyme) extract, olea europaea (olive) leaf extract, rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary) leaf extract, lavandula angustifolia (lavender) flower extract, hydrastis canadensis (golden seal) root extract
United Plant Savers, a nonprofit educational organization, has put many popular species such as American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius), black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa), echinacea (Echinacea ssp) and goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) on its list of critically threatened medicinal plants.
John's wort (Hypericum perforatum); ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba); garlic (Allium sativum); saw palmetto (Serenoa repens); ginseng (Panax ginseng, Panax quinquefolius); goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis); valerian (Valeriana officinalis); kava (Piper methysticum); chamomile (Matricaria recutita, Chamaemelum nobile); feverfew (Tanacetum perthenium); ginger (Zingiber officinale); ephedra (Ephedra spp.); liquorice/licorice (Glcyrrhiza glabra); evening primrose (Oenothera biennis); and milk thistle (Silybum marianum).
Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) -- This herb contains berberine, an ingredient with antibiotic properties.
Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) are both native North American medicinal plants that are threatened by overharvesting due to growing demand and loss of natural habitat.
During visits with pregnant patients, physicians also should be on the lookout for the use of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and ephedra (Ephedra sinica, ma huang, ephedrine, and Chinese joint fir), he added.
Conversely, the action of oral anticoagulants may be decreased with the use of ginseng (Ginseng radix), goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis), and green tea (Blumenthal et al., 1998; Heptinstall, White, Willimson, & Mitchell, 1985; Miller, 1998; Rowin & Lewis, 1996; Tyler, 1996; Yu, Chan, & Sanderson, 1997).
Physicians should be on the lookout for the use of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and ephedra (Ephedra sinica, ma huang, ephedrine, and Chinese joint fir).
A contribution to the life history of Hydrastis canadensis.