hydatid disease


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Related to hydatid disease: cysticercosis, Neurocysticercosis

hydatid

 [hi´dah-tid]
2. any cystlike structure.
hydatid disease an infection, usually of the liver, caused by larval forms (hydatid cysts) of tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus, and characterized by the development of expanding cysts. In the infection caused by E. granulosus, single or multiple cysts that are unilocular in character are formed, and in that caused by E. multilocularis, the host's tissues are invaded and destroyed as the cysts enlarge by peripheral budding. Called also echinococcosis.
hydatid of Morgagni a cystlike remnant of the müllerian duct attached to a testis or fallopian tube.
sessile hydatid the hydatid of Morgagni connected with a testis.
stalked hydatid the hydatid of Morgagni connected with a fallopian tube.

hy·da·tid dis·ease

infection of humans, sheep, and most other herbivorous and omnivorous mammals with larvae of the tapeworm Echinococcus cyst; frequently found in the liver.

hydatid disease

hydatid disease

See Hydatid cyst disease.

hy·da·tid dis·ease

(hī'dă-tid di-zēz')
Infection with the metacestode larvae of tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus.

hydatid disease

A disorder caused by ingesting tapeworm eggs so that the part of the worm life-cycle that normally occurs in dogs or pigs affects a human person. The worm embryos enter the bloodstream from the intestines and are carried to the liver, lungs, muscles and brain where they form cysts that gradually increase in size, causing variable damage. Brain cysts can cause EPILEPSY. Surgical removal of dangerous cysts may be necessary.

hydatid

1. a hydatid cyst.
2. any cyst-like structure.

hydatid cyst
the larval stage of the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus or E. multilocularis, containing daughter cysts, each of which, if fertile, will have many protoscoleces; it is the cause of hydatid disease. Called also Echinococcus cyst and hydatid.
hydatid disease
an infection in humans, sheep, cattle, pigs and horses, and occasionally in many other mammal species. The infection is usually of the liver or lungs, caused by larval forms (hydatid cysts) of tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus, and characterized by the development of expanding cysts. In the infection caused by E. granulosus, single or multiple cysts that are unilocular in character are formed, and in that caused by E. multilocularis, the host's tissues are invaded and destroyed as the cyst(s) enlarge by peripheral budding. Called also echinococcosis.
false hydatid
see cysticercustenuicollis.
Morgagni's hydatid
sessile hydatid
the hydatid of Morgagni connected with a testis.
stalked hydatid
the hydatid of Morgagni connected with an oviduct.
References in periodicals archive ?
Spillage-free laparoscopic management of hepatic hydatid disease using the hydatid trocar canula.
Cyst hydatid disease can be localized in any organ and it is an important public health issue in some countries including Turkey.
Direct rupture has the greatest clinical consequences which include anaphylaxis dissemination of hydatid disease (secondary hydatosis) w ithin the host and bacterial infection of the pericyst cavity5.
Our patient had a history of lung and liver hydatid disease five years ago.
Hydatid disease should be included in the differential diagnosis in cases of cystic spinal cord masses causing paraplegia in endemic areas.
Diagnosis of hydatid disease is difficult and based on clinical findings, imaging studies and serology.
The development of proper diagnostic serological techniques will help in diagnosis and control of hydatid disease (Moro et al.
The patient's age is very unusual for hydatid disease of the brain.