hydatid


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Related to hydatid: hydatid mole, hydatid cyst

hydatid

 [hi´dah-tid]
2. any cystlike structure.
hydatid disease an infection, usually of the liver, caused by larval forms (hydatid cysts) of tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus, and characterized by the development of expanding cysts. In the infection caused by E. granulosus, single or multiple cysts that are unilocular in character are formed, and in that caused by E. multilocularis, the host's tissues are invaded and destroyed as the cysts enlarge by peripheral budding. Called also echinococcosis.
hydatid of Morgagni a cystlike remnant of the müllerian duct attached to a testis or fallopian tube.
sessile hydatid the hydatid of Morgagni connected with a testis.
stalked hydatid the hydatid of Morgagni connected with a fallopian tube.

hy·da·tid

(hī'da-tid), Avoid the mispronunciation hydat'id. Do not confuse this word with hydatoid.
1. Synonym(s): hydatid cyst
2. A vesicular structure resembling an Echinococcus cyst.
[G. hydatis, a drop of water, a hyatid]

hydatid

/hy·da·tid/ (hi´dah-tid)
2. any cystlike structure.

hydatid of Morgagni 
1. a cystlike remnant of the müllerian duct on the upper end of the testis.
2. one of the small pedunculated structures attached to the uterine tubes near their fimbriated end; remnants of the mesonephric ducts.
sessile hydatid  h. of Morgagni (1).

hydatid

(hī′də-tĭd)
n.
1. A cyst formed as a result of infestation by larvae of an echinococcus tapeworm.
2. The encysted larva of such a tapeworm.

hydatid

[hī′dətid]
Etymology: Gk, hydatis, water drop
a cyst or cystlike structure that usually is filled with fluid, especially the cyst formed around the developing scolex of the dog tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. Humans and sheep can become hosts to the larval stage by ingesting the eggs. Hydatid cysts may be identified by palpation. They occur most commonly in the liver. An acute anaphylactoid allergic reaction may occur if the cyst ruptures. See also hydatid cyst, hydatid mole, hydatidosis. hydatic, adj.

hy·da·tid

(hī'dă-tid)
1. Synonym(s): hydatid cyst.
2. A vesicular structure resembling an Echinococcus cyst.
[G. hydatis, a drop of water, a hyatid]

hydatid

(hid'a-tid) [Gr. hydatis, watery vesicle]
Enlarge picture
HYDATID CYST: (orig. mag. ×500)
1. A cyst formed in the tissues, esp. the liver, from the development of the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus (one of the species of the dog tapeworm). The cyst develops slowly, forming a hollow bladder from the inner surface of which hollow brood capsules are formed. These may be attached to the mother cyst by slender stalks or may fall free into the fluid-filled cavity of the mother cyst. Scolices form on the inner surface of the older brood capsules. Older cysts have a granular deposit of brood capsules and scolices called hydatid sand. Hydatids may grow for years, sometimes to an enormous size. lbendazole, mebendazole, and praziquantel have been used to treat the disease. The cyst should be removed surgically or percutaneously drained. See: illustration; : echinococcosis
2. A small cystic remnant of an embryonic structure. See: choriocarcinoma; hydatid mole

hydatid of Morgagni

A cystlike remnant of the müllerian duct attached to the fallopian tube.

sessile hydatid

Morgagnian hydatid connected with a testicle.

stalked hydatid

Morgagnian hydatid connected with a fallopian tube.

hydatid

1. a hydatid cyst.
2. any cyst-like structure.

hydatid cyst
the larval stage of the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus or E. multilocularis, containing daughter cysts, each of which, if fertile, will have many protoscoleces; it is the cause of hydatid disease. Called also Echinococcus cyst and hydatid.
hydatid disease
an infection in humans, sheep, cattle, pigs and horses, and occasionally in many other mammal species. The infection is usually of the liver or lungs, caused by larval forms (hydatid cysts) of tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus, and characterized by the development of expanding cysts. In the infection caused by E. granulosus, single or multiple cysts that are unilocular in character are formed, and in that caused by E. multilocularis, the host's tissues are invaded and destroyed as the cyst(s) enlarge by peripheral budding. Called also echinococcosis.
false hydatid
see cysticercustenuicollis.
Morgagni's hydatid
sessile hydatid
the hydatid of Morgagni connected with a testis.
stalked hydatid
the hydatid of Morgagni connected with an oviduct.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abdominal cystic hydatid disease (CHD): classification of sonographic appearance and response to treatment.
Surgical treatment of giant hydatid cysts in childhood.
Many immunodiagnostic tests were reported to have overall sensitivity against the hydatid crude antigen.
Giant cell tumors, solitary bone cysts, aneurysmal bone cysts, fibrous dysplasia, bone metastasis, neurofibromatosis, and tuberculosis of the bone should be considered in the differential diagnosis of osseous hydatid disease.
In our institution, 23 children undergoing intracranial surgery between 1979 and 1995 were found to have hydatid cysts.
Patients were treated for retrovesical hydatid cyst over 9 years (January 2004-December 2013).
Conclusion: This study presents the course of hydatid disease and emphasizes the diagnostic challenges in follow up.
One of the factors that cause pancreatic fistula could be body mass index due to surgery on malignant tumors or benign masses of kidney-like renal hydatid cysts.
The differential diagnosis seen on MRI includes ganglion cysts, ependymal cysts, synovial cysts, epidermoid cysts or dermoid cysts, enterogenous cysts, teratogenous cysts, hydatid cysts, and intervertebral disc cysts (5,6).
Hydatid disease is a zoonotic infection caused by the larval forms of tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus, largely Echinococcus granulosus, and is endemic in Mediterranean regions, South Africa, South America and the Middle East (1,2).