hydatid


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Related to hydatid: hydatid mole, hydatid cyst

hydatid

 [hi´dah-tid]
2. any cystlike structure.
hydatid disease an infection, usually of the liver, caused by larval forms (hydatid cysts) of tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus, and characterized by the development of expanding cysts. In the infection caused by E. granulosus, single or multiple cysts that are unilocular in character are formed, and in that caused by E. multilocularis, the host's tissues are invaded and destroyed as the cysts enlarge by peripheral budding. Called also echinococcosis.
hydatid of Morgagni a cystlike remnant of the müllerian duct attached to a testis or fallopian tube.
sessile hydatid the hydatid of Morgagni connected with a testis.
stalked hydatid the hydatid of Morgagni connected with a fallopian tube.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hy·da·tid

(hī'da-tid), Avoid the mispronunciation hydat'id. Do not confuse this word with hydatoid.
1. Synonym(s): hydatid cyst
2. A vesicular structure resembling an Echinococcus cyst.
[G. hydatis, a drop of water, a hyatid]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hydatid

(hī′də-tĭd)
n.
1. A cyst formed as a result of infestation by larvae of an echinococcus tapeworm.
2. The encysted larva of such a tapeworm.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

hy·da·tid

(hī'dă-tid)
1. Synonym(s): hydatid cyst.
2. A vesicular structure resembling an Echinococcus cyst.
[G. hydatis, a drop of water, a hyatid]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hydatid

(hid'a-tid) [Gr. hydatis, watery vesicle]
Enlarge picture
HYDATID CYST: (orig. mag. ×500)
1. A cyst formed in the tissues, esp. the liver, from the development of the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus (one of the species of the dog tapeworm). The cyst develops slowly, forming a hollow bladder from the inner surface of which hollow brood capsules are formed. These may be attached to the mother cyst by slender stalks or may fall free into the fluid-filled cavity of the mother cyst. Scolices form on the inner surface of the older brood capsules. Older cysts have a granular deposit of brood capsules and scolices called hydatid sand. Hydatids may grow for years, sometimes to an enormous size. lbendazole, mebendazole, and praziquantel have been used to treat the disease. The cyst should be removed surgically or percutaneously drained. See: illustration; : echinococcosis
2. A small cystic remnant of an embryonic structure. See: choriocarcinoma; hydatid mole

hydatid of Morgagni

A cystlike remnant of the müllerian duct attached to the fallopian tube.

sessile hydatid

Morgagnian hydatid connected with a testicle.

stalked hydatid

Morgagnian hydatid connected with a fallopian tube.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Shirazi, "Isolated hydatid cyst of adrenal gland with hypertension mimicking Conn's syndrome: a very rare case," International Journal of Research in Medical Sciences, vol.
Most patients with a hydatid cyst in the liver are asymptomatic, and its presence becomes evident only when the liver is found to be enlarged or a cystic lesion is noted when the liver is imaged for any other reason [6].
* To study the different diagnostic modalities of hydatid disease of liver.
The diagnosis of hydatid disease is based on the identification of cyst structures by imaging techniques, such as ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and confirmation by immunodiagnostic studies (1).
Out of 67 sheep aged equal or less than one year, 21(31.3%) were infected with Hydatid cyst while, 69 (57%) of 121 sheep aged more than one year recorded as infected .
Although injecting a scolicidal solution is a widely-used practice during surgical or radiological intervention for the treatment of hydatid cyst, the objective evidence regarding the effect of this is controversial as there are studies confirming viable protoscoleces after proper usage of the most effective scolicidal agents, especially in the germinative membrane imprints (6).
The importance of protoscolicidal agents is still considerable in the treatment of hydatid disease; nonetheless, the ideal substances are those which are highly effective, inexpensive, and quick-acting with the fewest complications.
Between January 2008 and December 2015, 93 successive cases, which were studied in preoperative Echinococcus IgG and histopathologically found to have pulmonary hydatid cysts, were retrospectively analyzed.
Since 1991, 49 patients with 54 cysts who applied to the Ankara University Medical School Hospital were diagnosed with splenic hydatid disease.
In the seventh decade of the 20th century, researchers aimed to use benzemidazole and its derivatives such as benzadazole (ABZ), mebendazole (MBZ), flopendazole, and other drugs as a treatment for hydatid cysts disease (Bekhtiet al., 1977).