hybridization


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to hybridization: DNA hybridization

hybridization

 [hi″brid-ĭ-za´shun]
1. the production of hybrids.
fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) a genetic mapping technique using fluorescent tags for analysis of chromosomal aberrations and genetic abnormalities. Called also chromosome painting.
molecular hybridization in molecular biology, formation of a partially or wholly complementary nucleic acid duplex by association of single strands, usually between DNA and RNA strands or previously unassociated DNA strands, but also between RNA strands; used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands.

hy·brid·i·za·tion

(hī'brid-i-zā'shŭn),
1. The process of breeding a hybrid.
2. Crossing over between related but nonallelic genes.
3. The specific reassociation of complementary strands of polynucleic acids, for example, the formation of a DNA-RNA hybrid.
4. The process or act of forming a macromolecular hybrid in which the subunits are obtained from different sources.
Synonym(s): crossbreeding

hybridization

/hy·brid·iza·tion/ (hi″brid-ĭ-za´shun)
1. crossbreeding; the act or process of producing hybrids.
3. formation of a heterokaryon by fusion of two somatic cells, usually of different species.
4. in chemistry, a procedure whereby orbitals of intermediate energy and desired directional character are constructed.

in situ hybridization  molecular hybridization used to analyze prepared cells or histologic sections in situ in order to analyze the intracellular or intrachromosomal distribution, transcription, or other characteristics of specific nucleic acids.
molecular hybridization  formation of a partially or wholly complementary nucleic acid duplex by association of single strands, in order to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands.

hybridization

[hī′bridīzā′shən]
1 the process of producing hybrids by crossbreeding.
2 the process of combining single-stranded nucleic acids from different sources to form stable, double-stranded molecules. The technique involves fragmentation and separation of the source nucleic acids by heating, followed by recombination through cooling. The resulting hybrids can be DNA-DNA, DNA-RNA, or RNA-RNA duplexes.

hybridization

Molecular biology The formation of a complex of complementary nucleotides; hybridization allows determination of the relatedness or sequence 'homology' between 2 strands of nucleic acids, and precise ID of short–up to 20 kb segments of DNA–Southern blot or RNA–Northern blot

hy·brid·i·za·tion

(hī'brid-ī-zā'shŭn)
1. The process of breeding a hybrid.
2. Crossing over between related but nonallelic genes.
3. The specific association of complementary strands of polynucleic acids, e.g., the formation of a DNA-RNA hybrid.
Synonym(s): hybridisation.

hybridization

See MOLECULAR HYBRIDIZATION.

hy·brid·i·za·tion

(hī'brid-ī-zā'shŭn)
1. The process of breeding a hybrid.
2. Crossing over between related but nonallelic genes.
Synonym(s): hybridisation.

hybridization

the production of hybrids.

in situ hybridization of nucleic acid
a fragment of radioisotope or otherwise labeled DNA can be used as a probe to detect related nucleic acid sequences in cells or tissues. The method requires that both the probe and the cellular nucleic acid sequences be melted to single-stranded forms and then allowed to form either DNA:DNA or DNA:RNA double-stranded forms.
interspecies hybridization
see interspecific hybridoma.
nucleic acid hybridization
double-stranded DNA when heated in aqueous solution separates into two single strands in a process called denaturation or melting. The single strands readily reform a double helix when the solution is allowed to cool in a process called DNA renaturation. Hybridization will occur between any two single-stranded nucleic acid molecules (DNA:DNA, RNA:RNA, RNA:DNA) provided they have complementary nucleotide sequences. The degree of homology between any two nucleic acid molecules can be measured by the percentage of base pairing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bright-field HER2 dual in situ hybridization (DISH) assay vs fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH): focused study of immunohistochemical 2+ cases.
Hybridization in the red-eyed towhees of Mexico: the populations of the southeastern plateau region.
Immobilized single-stranded nucleic acid molecules should be fully accessible for hybridization and also must be in as fluid an environment as possible in order for hybridization reaction kinetics and yields to approach those observed for solution phase experiments.
A minimum of 5 high-quality metaphase spreads from chromosomes of similar length were analyzed from each hybridization, and average red-to-green fluorescence intensity ratio profiles were generated for each chromosome.
The process of hybridization of specialties does not encounter disciplinary paradigms.
5) This assay was created by combining two kinds of hybridization and signal detection chemistries for HER2 gene and CEN17 targets into one assay on a single tissue section.
They concluded that when modern humans expanded out of Africa 60-70K years ago, they would have brought out that additional genetic similarity with them, making Europeans and Asians more similar to Neanderthals than Africans are on average - undermining the theory that hybridization, and not common ancestry, explained these differences.
The scientists concluded that when modern humans expanded out of Africa 60-70K years ago, they would have brought out that additional genetic similarity with them, making Europeans and Asians more similar to Neanderthals than Africans are on average -- undermining the theory that hybridization, and not common ancestry, explained these differences.
Aiming to examine the causes and ways malignant neoplasms affect normal cells to cause cancer, the authors of this volume focus on the hybridization hypothesis of formation.
Research on avian hybridization played a key role in the development of the New Synthesis (Mayr 1942), and remains at the forefront of modern evolutionary biology (Prager and Wilson 1975, Grant and Grant 1992, Price 2008).
Hybridization of double-stranded DNA with nucleic acid probes is hampered by competition between the complementary nontarget strand and the probe (1).