hybrid

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hybrid

 [hi´brid]
an offspring of parents of different strains, varieties, or species.

hy·brid

(hī'brid),
1. An individual (plant or animal) with parents that are different varieties of the same species or belong to different but closely allied species.
2. Fused tissue culture cells, as in a hybridoma.
3. A bond or valence orbital obtained by the linear combination of two or more different atomic orbitals.
Synonym(s): crossbreed (1)
[L. hybrida, offspring of a tame sow and a wild boar, fr. G. hybris, violation, wantonness]

hybrid

(hī′brĭd)
n.
Genetics The offspring of genetically dissimilar parents or stock, especially the offspring produced by breeding plants or animals of different varieties, species, or races.

hy′brid·ism n.
hy′brid·ist n.
hy·brid′i·ty (hī-brĭd′ĭ-tē) n.

hy·brid

(hī'brid)
1. An individual (plant or animal) with parents that are different varieties of the same species or that belong to different but closely allied species.
2. Fused tissue culture cells, as in a hybridoma.
[L. hybrida, offspring of a tame sow and a wild boar, fr. G. hybris, violation, wantonness]

hybrid

an offspring of a cross between two genetically unlike individuals. See also HETEROZYGOTE, HETEROSIS.

hy·brid

(hī'brid)
1. An individual (plant or animal) with parents that are different varieties of the same species or belong to different but closely allied species.
2. Fused tissue culture cells, as in a hybridoma.
[L. hybrida, offspring of a tame sow and a wild boar, fr. G. hybris, violation, wantonness]
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a sign of hybridity on the grounds that a native Igbo was overwhelmed by the English and their way of life, that he did not expect a man from England living in a mutual stay with somebody.
Hybridity therefore comes into play to further demonstrate this rediscovery and significance of indigenous culture to the postcolonial subject.
This function of hybridity is evident in Lucian himself, as in Lucian's Fugitivi, the sophist is not unlike the centaur: a hybrid creature, incapable of being wholly dedicated to philosophy or to ignorance, wandering in the interspace between an impersonator and a philosopher (Luc.
Hybridity as a term has been explored in relation to education, where it has been described as being "about the moment of play, in which the two sides of the binary begin to dance around (and through) one another before landing in some new configuration.
Although hybridity does hold the promise of greater intercultural understanding, it should be remembered that flows of texts are still organized with asymmetrical power (Hannerz, 1996; Iwabuchi, 2005).
Cultural hybridity, therefore, encompassing the past and the present, may be used to define the mixture of cultures feeding from different cultures (Eastern-Western), just like those minorities with differing identities in America, Great Britain, Africa, and India (Bhabha, The Location of Culture 20, 60), or the cultures that stem from the same origin (Islamic-Ottoman-Turkic), such as modern Turkey.
My own ongoing involvement with jewellery has, as mentioned earlier, resulted from more or less coincidental encounters between the heterogeneous worlds of makers and the writer that I am, so that I was constantly faced with the issue of hybridity in questions like: How do words and metals tally?
Oliete-Aldea's insights into the connections between the 1980s Raj productions and the Thatcherite period could have included a dialogue with other film texts from the period, but set in post-colonial India, such as 36 Chowringhee Lane (Aparna Sen, 1981) which would have made the discussion even more enriching and engaging with regard to hybridity, female identity and, ultimately, ideology.
A much more arresting case of hybridity occurs in the "grafting" of Greek onto the predominately English translation.
The Mezzogiorno--where Norman mercenaries rose to power surrounded by Lombards, Greeks, and Muslims--lends itself to the models of transcultural hybridity that Foerster and Burkhardt want to investigate, and nine of the thirteen essays within the volume focus on the Italian South and Kingdom of Sicily.
This article uses the diaspora and transnationalism theory and the hybridity as a creolisation theory as critical lenses for the exploration of Afropolitanism in Ghana must go (2013).