hybridize

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hybridize

(hī′brĭ-dīz′)
v. hybrid·ized, hybrid·izing, hybrid·izes
v.intr.
1. To produce hybrids; crossbreed.
2. To form base pairs between complementary regions of two strands of DNA that were not originally paired.
v.tr.
To cause to produce a hybrid; crossbreed.

hy′brid·i·za′tion (-brĭ-dĭ-zā′shən) n.
hy′brid·iz′er n.
References in periodicals archive ?
The BioStories studies have shown that writing hybridised narratives in science can be equally interesting for both middle- and senior-school students.
Alternatively, hybridised scientific narratives can "promote students' scientific literacy by developing their interest in and capacity to apply scientific thinking to social issues for the purposes of informed action, where the students can learn to cross borders between specialist and more popular genres and readerships" (Hand & Prain, 2002, p.
The introduction of the Foundation to Year 10 Australian Curriculum: Science (Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority [ACARA], n.d.) affords exciting opportunities to develop hybridised writing tasks about socioscientific issues that support the Science Understanding strand of the new curriculum.
For example, writing hybridised stories about biosecurity, organ and tissue transplantation or coal seam gas mining presents opportunities to explore the ways in which science and technology contribute to finding solutions to important socioscientific issues, and the social and ethical considerations implicated by these applications of science.
Teachers could just as easily implement their own online hybridised writing projects by using Web 2.0 technologies that emphasise online learning and collaboration.
The cognitive and affective outcomes of the projects summarised in this paper serve to illustrate the value of engaging students in the writing of hybridised scientific narratives as a way of developing their conceptual understanding, enhancing their attitudes toward science and science learning, and eliciting positive emotional responses.
Hybridised parenting can be beneficial for both immigrant families and children, as it enables families to develop new insights into their parenting practices and assists them with their cultural adaptations (Kuran & Sandholm, 2003).
While it is difficult to say whether a hybridised identity is useful for children growing up in a diverse society--hybridised parenting will have significant consequences for immigrant children's identity development that is derived from their home culture (Jensen, 2003).
The present discussion on the notion of hybridised parenting also suggests implications for early childhood educators working in settings that cater for immigrant families and their children.
Therefore, empirical research is needed to substantiate the cultural impacts of globalisation and hybridised parenting in immigrant families.
b) Is cultural globalisation leading to hybridised parenting in immigrant families?