hyaluronidase


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Related to hyaluronidase: hyaluronic acid

hyaluronidase

 [hi″ah-lu-ron´ĭ-dās]
1. an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of hyaluronic acid, the “cement material” of connective tissues; it is found in human testes, as well as in leeches, snake venom, and spider venom, and is produced by various pathogenic bacteria, enabling them to spread through tissue.
2. a preparation derived from the secretion of mammalian testes, used to promote absorption and diffusion of solutions injected subcutaneously. When it is mixed with fluids administered subcutaneously, absorption is more rapid and less uncomfortable. This is especially valuable when large amounts of fluid must be given by hypodermoclysis instead of intravenously. The hyaluronidase should be dissolved just before it is used and usually is injected with the first portion of the fluid to be given. Hyaluronidase should not be given in areas where there is infection. Since it hastens absorption, it must be given with caution when administered with toxic drugs, as a toxic reaction can occur rapidly.

hy·a·lu·ron·i·dase

(hī'ă-lū-ron'i-dās),
1. Term applied loosely to hyaluronate lyase, hyaluronoglucosaminidase, and hyaluronoglucuronidase, one or more of which are present in sperm, the testes, and other organs, bee and snake venoms, type II pneumonococci, and certain hemolytic streptococci. Synonym(s): diffusing factor, Duran-Reynals permeability factor, Duran-Reynals spreading factor, invasin, spreading factor
2. A soluble enzyme product prepared from mammalian testes; it is used to increase the effect of local anesthetics and to permit wider infiltration of subcutaneously administered fluids, is suggested in the treatment of certain forms of arthritis to promote resolution of redundant tissue, is used to speed the resorption of traumatic or postoperative edema and hematoma, is used in combination with collagenase to dissociate organs, such as liver and heart, into viable cell suspensions, and in histochemistry is used on tissue secretions to verify the presence of hyaluronic acid or chondroitin sulfates.

hyaluronidase

(hī′ə-lo͝o-rŏn′ĭ-dās′, -dāz′)
n.
An enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of hyaluronic acid in the body, thereby increasing tissue permeability to fluids. Also called spreading factor.

hyaluronidase

(1) Hyaluronoglucosaminidase, EC 3.2.1.35.
(2) Hyaluronoglucuronidase, EC 3.2.1.36.
(3) Hyaluronate lyase, EC 4.2.2.1.

hyaluronidase

An enzyme that breaks down proteins holding tissue planes together. Its use assists in the dispersal of tissue fluids or injected drugs. A brand name is Hyalase.

hyaluronidase

an enzyme present in snake venom and bacteria that catalyses the hydrolysis of hyaluronic acid, thus making it ineffective in stopping the spread of invading microorganisms and other toxic substances.

Duran-Reynals,

Francisco, U.S. bacteriologist, 1899-1958.
Duran-Reynals permeability factor - a soluble enzyme product prepared from mammalian testes. Synonym(s): hyaluronidase

hy·a·lu·ron·i·dase

(hī'ă-lū-ron'i-dās)
Soluble enzyme product prepared from mammalian testes; used to increase the effect of local anesthetics and to permit wider infiltration of subcutaneously administered fluids, is suggested in the treatment of forms of arthritis to promote resolution of redundant tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Then, at 1, 2, and 3 weeks, they administered 1.5 U, 3.0 U, or 9.0 U hyaluronidase per 0.1 raL or saline control (at a constant volume of 0.1 mL) into each site.
"Although very small doses of hyaluronidase can remove hyaluronic acid fillers from patient skin, slightly higher doses often result in more rapid resolution," the authors write.
(d) Alcian blue staining disappears after hyaluronidase digestion (200x).
Only one of the five patients required hyaluronidase to remove excessive filler.
Hyaluronidase is part of extracellular bacterial structure that degrade hyaluronic acid , hyaluronidases event by [BETA] elimination of the [BETA]-1,4 glycosidic bond in hyaluronic acid[5].
Simpson, "Emerging roles for hyaluronidase in cancer metastasis and therapy," Advances in Cancer Research, vol.
Inactivated hyaluronidase or heparanase had no effect on the release of the enzymes tested.
AquaMax extends the life of hyaluronic acid in the skin by inhibiting the action of the hyaluronidase, a collection of enzymes that hydrolyze hyaluronic acid (HA) for first reference.
Hyaluronidase inhibition assay was studied in vitro using bovine testicular hyaluronidase and human umbilical cord hyaluronic acid.