hyaluronic acid

(redirected from hyaluronic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

hyaluronic acid

 [hi″ah-loo͡-ron´ik]
a glycosamino-glycan found in lubricating proteoglycans of synovial fluid, vitreous humor, cartilage, blood vessels, skin, and the umbilical cord.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hy·a·lu·ron·ic ac·id

(hī'ă-lū-ron'ik as'id),
A mucopolysaccharide consisting of alternating β1,4-linked residues of hyalobiuronic acid, forming a gelatinous material in the tissue spaces and acting as a lubricant and shock absorbant generally throughout the body; it is hydrolyzed to disaccharide or tetrasaccharide units by hyaluronidase.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hyaluronic acid

(hī′ə-lo͝o-rŏn′ĭk)
n.
A glycosaminoglycan that is found in extracellular tissue space, the synovial fluid of joints, and the vitreous humor of the eyes and acts as a binding, lubricating, and protective agent.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

hy·a·lu·ron·ic ac·id

(hī'ă-lūr-on'ik as'id)
A mucopolysaccharide forming a gelatinous material in the tissue spaces and acting as a lubricant and shock absorbant; hydrolyzed by hyaluronidase.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hyaluronic acid

Hyaluronate, a long polymer glycosaminoglycan, consisting of repeating disaccharide units, found in basement membranes, mature oocytes, skin, cartilage, the vitreous body of the eye and the synovial fluid of joints.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

hy·a·lu·ron·ic ac·id

(hī'ă-lūr-on'ik as'id)
A mucopolysaccharide forming a gelatinous material in the tissue spaces and acting as a lubricant and shock absorbant.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
After years of technological innovation, Matexcel provides nearly 50 Hyaluronic acid products for customers to choose including: Hyaluronic acid sodium salt from Streptococcus equi, 1.2KDa, Hyaluronic acid sodium salt from Streptococcus equi, 8-15KDa, Hyaluronic acid sodium salt from bovine vitreous humor, Hyaluronic acid sodium salt from rooster comb, Hyaluronic acid sodium salt from Streptococcus zooepidemicus, FITC-labelled Hyaluronic Acid, >1000 KDa, Hyaluronic Acid Sodium Salt, 600-1000 kDa, etc.
This enables aging individuals to replenish the collagen and hyaluronic acid found naturally in youthful skin.
A recent international survey found that 45% of dermatologists identified leakage as the main problem with hyaluronic acid syringes.High viscosity solutions have traditionally been administered by dermatologists using both glass and plastic syringes.
As we grow old, hyaluronic acid, which is naturally produced in our human bodies to lubricate movable parts of our bodies like joints and muscles declines.
Absorption experiment using hyaluronic acid: The outside of the acclimated HOE and RHE models was treated with 100 [micro]L of 0.5% fluoresceinamine-labeled sodium hyaluronate (average molecular weight 600,000 to 1,120,000), and the models were incubated at 37[degrees]C for 3 and 6 hours, respectively.
Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring substance in the body.
Murad Alam, M.D., from Northwestern University in Chicago, and colleagues conducted a randomized clinical trial involving nine healthy women to examine the effectiveness of small quantities of hyaluronidase to treat hyaluronic acid filler nodules.
When the symptoms did not abate, she visited a dermatologist who said her pain was a result of the hyaluronic acid and he offered her a different treatment.
Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring substance under the dermis that gives volume and elasticity to the skin.
Bioventus also has launched DUROLANE, its single-injection, hyaluronic acid (HA) product for joint lubrication in knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain treatment.
Related to this function, in clinical cases of VUR, the most common findings have been purple-blue dextranomer microspheres, a blue-gray amorphous material (hyaluronic acid), granulomatous reactions with multinucleated giant cells, inflammatory infiltrates (i.e., lymphocytes, plasma cells), pseudoencapsulation of microspheres with fibrosis, and sometimes calcification [11, 16, 17].