husk

(redirected from husks)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to husks: Corn husks

husk

 [husk]
an outer covering or shell, as of some fruits and seeds.
psyllium husk the cleaned, dried seed coat from the seeds of Plantago species; used as a bulk-forming laxative.

husk

(husk) an outer covering or shell, as of some fruits and seeds.
psyllium husk  the cleaned, dried seed coat from the seeds of Plantago species; used as a bulk-forming laxative; also used for various purposes in ayurveda and folk medicine.

husk

see lungworm disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each of these devices has the same purpose: They are used to grab the ear and tear some of the husk away.
Pull the husk back but keep it attached, and then wrap the cob in raw bacon.
We use 330 metric tons of rice husks every day to power the plant," Alfonso said.
2013) and were compared with concentrations in walnut husk maggot larval tissue to increase our understanding of insecticide translocation in this system.
Tire company The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company (NasdaqGS:GT) announced on Monday that it is now producing fuel-efficient tires from rice husk ash waste.
Average diameters of growth with respect to the media used for pod husks samples after 72 h of incubation (Fig.
The objective of this study was to determine the maximum amount of rice husk content that can be added into the recycled polymer blend in order to produce high loading biocomposites.
Besides wheat husk, corn cob, corn husk, maize stem, are other sources of power generation currently being used in the cement, paper and brick kiln industries.
To test their theory out, Choi's and his team converted the silica from rice husk into pure silicon and then created battery electrodes out of it.
Then, the clean roots had their husks manually extracted with the aid of a knife, and they were broken into pieces before being taken to a heated ventilated chamber at 100[degrees]C.
Rice husks comprise 22% of a rice paddy, and this waste material contains about 35 to 44% carbon [17,18], whereas tire dust contains about 29 to 31% carbon [19,20].