hunter-gatherer diet

hunter-gatherer diet

Anthropology
A diet rich in animal protein, fruits and plants and virtually devoid of grains and dairy products, which is the presumed diet of primitive man. (Consumption of grains and use of dairy products translate as the ability to cultivate and harvest plants and domesticate milk-producing animals, both of which represent later development of early man.) Some alternative healthcare providers believe that the allergies commonly seen in modern man may be due to changes in the human diet.

Nutrition
See Palaeo diet.
References in periodicals archive ?
I usually recommend the hunter-gatherer diet because it makes sense to me that our genetics are adapted to that and puts the least stress on our genes.
We evolved and developed to survive on a hunter-gatherer diet of fruit, vegetables and lean meat and, according to some scientists, we are not particularly well adapted to eating the cereals and dairy products that are now our staples.
The ancient hunter-gatherer diet had a high potassium/sodium ratio.
Premise: The basic tenet is that our species is adapted to a hunter-gatherer diet that kept us in good health before the era of cultivated grains.
Comparison of the nutrient content of a hunter-gatherer diet with that of a modern diet designed to avert chronic disease showed some close similarities and indicated the absence of recognised risk factors for the chronic diseases found in the present Aboriginal population of northwestern Australia.
The hunter-gatherer diet (which assigns an adequate intake of 2390 kcal per person/day) is essentially one of cereal and fresh fruit plus dried fruit (combined together), with a moderate amount of meat.
Table 3 shows that the hunter-gatherer diet was high in vitamin C, derived almost entirely from fresh and dried fruits, but did not achieve the high vitamin C content of the modern recommended diet that contained large amounts of fresh fruits and vegetables.
It would certainly have been true that the largely vegetarian hunter-gatherer diet was low in sodium.
The values for minor dietary constituents in the hunter-gatherer diet have been derived from Brand Miller et al (1993), together with underlying data for dietary composition from Figure 4.
There are even signs that moving away from hunter-gatherer diets to eating patterns based on cultivated crops, such as grains caused nutritional problems among our ancestors, according to Armelagos' article in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.
Plant-animal subsistence ratios and macronutrient energy estimations in worldwide hunter-gatherer diets.
She then examines recent nutritional and biochemical research into fats (some of which analyses hunter-gatherer diets and their relation to metabolic and cardiovascular health).