humour


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humour

A fluid or gel-like substance.

hu·mor

(hyū'mŏr) [TA]
1. Any clear fluid or semifluid hyaline anatomic substance.
2. One of the elemental body fluids that were the basis of the physiologic and pathologic teachings of the hippocratic school: blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm.
Synonym(s): humour.
[L. correctly, umor, liquid]

humour

The possession of, or the capacity to perceive, those things which excite laughter or the desire to laugh. Humour is one of the more mysterious characteristics of the human being and its nature has been endlessly argued. We laugh when we are painlessly surprised; when we perceive foolishness or qualities to which we consider ourselves superior; when we see the pompous deflated, the powerful threatened or the consciously superior mocked. Theories abound, none of them entirely convincing. Humour is, however, a valuable human attribute and its absence is a personality defect.

humour

any body fluid, particularly those in front of, and behind, the lens of the eye, the AQUEOUS HUMOUR and VITREOUS HUMOUR.

hu·mor

(hyū'mŏr) [TA]
1. Any clear fluid or semifluid hyaline anatomic substance.
2. One of the elemental body fluids that were the basis of the physiologic and pathologic teachings of the hippocratic school: blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm.
See also: humoral doctrine
Synonym(s): humour.
[L. correctly, umor, liquid]
References in periodicals archive ?
Using humour in the classroom is like playing a tennis game where every participant and observer sees a different foul line.
Toilet humour, sexual innuendo and racial insults pass off as gags, which makes one wonder why our comedians and radio jockeys find it so difficult to outgrow their school- day locker rooms.
Humour is a powerful intervention that has come to light in recent years as an effective tool for improving health.
Whether it is satire or humour both require sincerity and fidelity, whereas, prejudice, priggishness and ego are all considered injurious for them.
Sample, and "Discovering Humour in Modern China: The Launching of the Analects Fortnightly Journal and the 'Year of Humour' (1933)," by Qian Suogiao, do exactly this sort of careful social and historical contextualization for the work of Lin Yutang.
COR considers sense of humour as a valuable personal resource (Hobfoll, 2001).
The effects of coping humour on college adjustment in Turkish culture remain unclear.
They raise awareness of the ways humour and fun contribute to workplace enjoyment and personal/team productivity.
Her Laughter Matters talk will investigate how effective strategic humour is in the classroom.
Following a brief look at the literature it became apparent that humour is used constructively in many healthcare settings across the USA as an alleviator of stress.
The results, as well as being consistent with the positive connotations traditionally attributed to the act of 'laughing at oneself' in our country, also suggest that the effects of self-defeating humour on well-being may differ depending on where the research takes places," Marin said.
They argue that it takes both cognitive and emotional ability to process and produce humour.