humour

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Related to humors: humoral theory

humour

A fluid or gel-like substance.

hu·mor

(hyū'mŏr) [TA]
1. Any clear fluid or semifluid hyaline anatomic substance.
2. One of the elemental body fluids that were the basis of the physiologic and pathologic teachings of the hippocratic school: blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm.
Synonym(s): humour.
[L. correctly, umor, liquid]

humour

The possession of, or the capacity to perceive, those things which excite laughter or the desire to laugh. Humour is one of the more mysterious characteristics of the human being and its nature has been endlessly argued. We laugh when we are painlessly surprised; when we perceive foolishness or qualities to which we consider ourselves superior; when we see the pompous deflated, the powerful threatened or the consciously superior mocked. Theories abound, none of them entirely convincing. Humour is, however, a valuable human attribute and its absence is a personality defect.

humour

any body fluid, particularly those in front of, and behind, the lens of the eye, the AQUEOUS HUMOUR and VITREOUS HUMOUR.

hu·mor

(hyū'mŏr) [TA]
1. Any clear fluid or semifluid hyaline anatomic substance.
2. One of the elemental body fluids that were the basis of the physiologic and pathologic teachings of the hippocratic school: blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm.
See also: humoral doctrine
Synonym(s): humour.
[L. correctly, umor, liquid]
References in periodicals archive ?
Modern theories of humor relate to "incongruities," things happening to others that are not supposed to occur.
Several milestones that contributed to the current interest in the healing potential of humor are noteworthy.
* Joel Goodman (1977) creates the "Humor Project, bringing awareness to the idea that s smiling and laughter can heal us.
He assumes a too simplified vision of modernity: Galileo, whom he quotes as the symbol of modern science, was profoundly influenced - in his own work as a scientist - by Pythagorean and neo-platonic mysticism; astrology was amply practiced by nineteenth-century European scientists, and references to humors and heavens can be found in contemporary political language.
How does this complexity of Jewish identity play out in the humor itself?
A lot of Jewish humor deals with identity: Jews developed an insider/ outsider sensibility in the countries that they came from.
Each of the characters plagued by a particular humor eventually overcomes his personal disorder.