humour

(redirected from humorous)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

humour

A fluid or gel-like substance.

hu·mor

(hyū'mŏr) [TA]
1. Any clear fluid or semifluid hyaline anatomic substance.
2. One of the elemental body fluids that were the basis of the physiologic and pathologic teachings of the hippocratic school: blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm.
Synonym(s): humour.
[L. correctly, umor, liquid]

humour

The possession of, or the capacity to perceive, those things which excite laughter or the desire to laugh. Humour is one of the more mysterious characteristics of the human being and its nature has been endlessly argued. We laugh when we are painlessly surprised; when we perceive foolishness or qualities to which we consider ourselves superior; when we see the pompous deflated, the powerful threatened or the consciously superior mocked. Theories abound, none of them entirely convincing. Humour is, however, a valuable human attribute and its absence is a personality defect.

humour

any body fluid, particularly those in front of, and behind, the lens of the eye, the AQUEOUS HUMOUR and VITREOUS HUMOUR.

hu·mor

(hyū'mŏr) [TA]
1. Any clear fluid or semifluid hyaline anatomic substance.
2. One of the elemental body fluids that were the basis of the physiologic and pathologic teachings of the hippocratic school: blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm.
See also: humoral doctrine
Synonym(s): humour.
[L. correctly, umor, liquid]
References in classic literature ?
Almost all were agreed that what Bell had done was a humorous trifle.
The Professor has a strongly humorous side, and I could from old knowledge detect a trace of its origin in his answer.
He seemed to hear some one make a humorous remark in a low tone.
But with the Pygmies he was the most sportive and humorous, and merry-hearted, and sweet-tempered old Giant that ever washed his face in a wet cloud.
Milesians = slang for Irish (from Milesius, a mythical Spanish conqueror of Ireland); Miss Dosie = Miss Eudosia; bossee = humorous for a female boss; coteries = social sets}
Maintaining this position for a moment, the strange emotions depicted on his countenance soften down into one of humorous resignation to my will, and then looking wistfully up to the tufted top of the tree, he stands on tip-toe, straining his neck and elevating his arm, as though endeavouring to reach the fruit from the ground where he stands.
If the part is trifling she will have more credit in making something of it; and if she is so desperately bent against everything humorous, let her take Cottager's speeches instead of Cottager's wife's, and so change the parts all through; he is solemn and pathetic enough, I am sure.
An observer with anything of an eye for national types would have had no difficulty in determining the local origin of this undeveloped connoisseur, and indeed such an observer might have felt a certain humorous relish of the almost ideal completeness with which he filled out the national mould.
Lady Arabella was not usually a humorous person, but no man or woman of the white race could have checked the laughter which rose spontaneously to her lips.
But the most ordinary cause of a single life, is liberty, especially in certain self-pleasing and humorous minds, which are so sensible of every restraint, as they will go near to think their girdles and garters, to be bonds and shackles.
He was a stern, gaunt man, with a harsh voice, and an aggressive manner, but he had the merit of knowing how to assimilate the ideas of other men, and to pass them on in a way which was intelligible and even interesting to the lay public, with a happy knack of being funny about the most unlikely objects, so that the precession of the Equinox or the formation of a vertebrate became a highly humorous process as treated by him.
A humorous reply appeared in the February number of the Bulletins de la Societe Geographique of Geneva, which very wittily showed up the Royal Society of London and their phenomenal sturgeon.