humor


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humor

 [hu´mor] (pl. humors, humo´res) (L.)
1. any fluid or semifluid in the body, adj., adj hu´moral.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitating the patient to perceive, appreciate, and express what is funny, amusing, or ludicrous in order to establish relationships, relieve tension, release anger, facilitate learning, or cope with painful feelings.
aqueous humor the fluid produced in the eye and filling the spaces (anterior chamber and posterior chamber) in front of the lens and its attachments. It diffuses out of the eye into the blood and is regarded as the lymph of the eye, although its composition is different from that of the lymph in the rest of the body.
ocular humor either of the humors of the eye—aqueous or vitreous.
vitreous humor the fluid portion of the vitreous body; often used to designate the entire vitreous body.

hu·mor

, gen.

hu·mor·is

(hyū'mŏr, hyū-mōr'is), [TA]
1. Any clear fluid or semifluid hyaline anatomic substance.
See also: humoral doctrine.
2. One of the elemental body fluids that were the basis of the physiologic and pathologic teachings of the hippocratic school: blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm.
See also: humoral doctrine.
[L. correctly, umor, liquid]

humor

(hyo͞o′mər)
n.
1. One of the four fluids of the body, blood, phlegm, choler, and black bile, whose relative proportions were thought in ancient and medieval physiology to determine a person's disposition and general health.
2. Physiology
a. A body fluid, such as blood, lymph, or bile.
b. Aqueous humor.
c. Vitreous humor.
3. A person's characteristic disposition or temperament: a boy of sullen humor.

humour

A fluid or gel-like substance.

humor

1. A fluid or gel-like substance. See Aqueous humor, Vitreous humor.
2. Hardiharharness. See Laughter.

hu·mor

(hyū'mŏr) [TA]
1. Any clear fluid or semifluid hyaline anatomic substance.
2. One of the elemental body fluids that were the basis of the physiologic and pathologic teachings of the hippocratic school: blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm.
Synonym(s): humour.
[L. correctly, umor, liquid]

hu·mor

(hyū'mŏr) [TA]
1. Any clear fluid or semifluid hyaline anatomic substance.
2. One of the elemental body fluids that were the basis of the physiologic and pathologic teachings of the hippocratic school: blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm.
See also: humoral doctrine
Synonym(s): humour.
[L. correctly, umor, liquid]
References in periodicals archive ?
* hipoteza 3--nauczyciele czesciej stosuja nieadaptacyjne style humoru (humor agresywny i samodeprecjonujacy) niz style adaptacyjne (humor afiliacyjny i w sluzbie ego),
"Creative language -- and humor in particular -- is one of the hardest areas for computational intelligence to grasp," said Miller, who has analyzed more than 10,000 puns and called it torture.
The article stated, "Humor can help you create a classroom your students love being part of.
Finalizando o grupo de artigos que colocou em evidencia o humor grafico e os quadrinhos de humor produzido por mulheres, o artigo Um breve panorama do humor nos quadrinhos feministas suecos a partir da obra de Nina Hemmingsson, Malin Biller e Liv Stronquist, de autoria de Natania Nogueira, sinaliza a Suecia como um pais que tem construido politicas de igualdade de genero em editoras e, consequentemente, fortalecido o mercado dos quadrinhos produzidos por mulheres.
Rather than celebrating humor as liberatory, the book takes a clear-eyed look at how humorous texts operate and how even the noncomic aspects are essential to the pleasures, motivations, and interpretations of the texts.
The researchers reached their conclusions - which are now published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences - after applying psychometric analysis to study the humor of 1,068 adults aged 18-65.
Hall offers four explanations for why humor is so important in finding partners:
Most human beings, including therapists, have experienced the negative and destructive elements of humor through ridicule, teasing and other forms of aggressive humor.
So we often ask: Has political correctness narrowed the scope of humor? Has it multiplied the lines it shouldn't cross?
Even laughter, which provides a measurable consequence of humor, still does not provide a foolproof measure of humor itself - we've all appreciated a joke but not laughed, and everyone's faked a giggle when they felt social pressure to do so.