humor


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humor

 [hu´mor] (pl. humors, humo´res) (L.)
1. any fluid or semifluid in the body, adj., adj hu´moral.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitating the patient to perceive, appreciate, and express what is funny, amusing, or ludicrous in order to establish relationships, relieve tension, release anger, facilitate learning, or cope with painful feelings.
aqueous humor the fluid produced in the eye and filling the spaces (anterior chamber and posterior chamber) in front of the lens and its attachments. It diffuses out of the eye into the blood and is regarded as the lymph of the eye, although its composition is different from that of the lymph in the rest of the body.
ocular humor either of the humors of the eye—aqueous or vitreous.
vitreous humor the fluid portion of the vitreous body; often used to designate the entire vitreous body.

hu·mor

, gen.

hu·mor·is

(hyū'mŏr, hyū-mōr'is), [TA]
1. Any clear fluid or semifluid hyaline anatomic substance.
See also: humoral doctrine.
2. One of the elemental body fluids that were the basis of the physiologic and pathologic teachings of the hippocratic school: blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm.
See also: humoral doctrine.
[L. correctly, umor, liquid]

humor

/hu·mor/ (hu´mer) pl. humors, humo´res   [L.] any fluid or semifluid of the body.hu´moral
aqueous humor  the fluid produced in the eye and filling the spaces (anterior and posterior) in front of the lens and its attachments.
ocular humor  either of the humors (aqueous and vitreous) of the eye.
vitreous humor 
1. the fluid portion of the vitreous body.

humor

(hyo͞o′mər)
n.
1. One of the four fluids of the body, blood, phlegm, choler, and black bile, whose relative proportions were thought in ancient and medieval physiology to determine a person's disposition and general health.
2. Physiology
a. A body fluid, such as blood, lymph, or bile.
b. Aqueous humor.
c. Vitreous humor.
3. A person's characteristic disposition or temperament: a boy of sullen humor.

humor1

[hyo̅o̅′mər]
Etymology: L, humidus, moist
any body fluid or semifluid substance such as blood or lymph. The term is often used in reference to the aqueous humor or the vitreous humor of the eye.

humor2

a nursing intervention from the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) defined as facilitating the patient to perceive, appreciate, and express what is funny, amusing, or ludicrous in order to establish relationships, relieve tension, release anger, facilitate learning, or cope with painful feelings. See also Nursing Interventions Classification.

humour

A fluid or gel-like substance.

humor

1. A fluid or gel-like substance. See Aqueous humor, Vitreous humor.
2. Hardiharharness. See Laughter.

hu·mor

(hyū'mŏr) [TA]
1. Any clear fluid or semifluid hyaline anatomic substance.
2. One of the elemental body fluids that were the basis of the physiologic and pathologic teachings of the hippocratic school: blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm.
Synonym(s): humour.
[L. correctly, umor, liquid]

humor,

n 1. fluid found in the body, particularly lymph or blood.
2. any amusing, funny, or ludicrous insights that medical personnel and patients can share to laugh and relieve stress, release anger, form relationships, and cope with difficult situations.

hu·mor

(hyū'mŏr) [TA]
1. Any clear fluid or semifluid hyaline anatomic substance.
2. One of the elemental body fluids that were the basis of the physiologic and pathologic teachings of the hippocratic school: blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm.
See also: humoral doctrine
Synonym(s): humour.
[L. correctly, umor, liquid]

humor

pl. humores, humors [L.] any fluid or semifluid in the body.

aqueous humor
see aqueous humor.
ocular humor
either of the humors of the eye—aqueous or vitreous.
vitreous humor
see vitreous humor.
References in periodicals archive ?
To suppress humor because of its capability to offend a minority is also suppressing freedom of speech.
A: First, teachers can help students realize why we should be serious about humor (see above).
The present study aimed at formulating a gendered perspective on the impact of various types of humor on perceived stress among university students.
Ethnic Identification and the Perceived Humor and Rudeness of Ethnic Jokes.
In other words, the disharmony of phenomenon and essence, form and content, aim and means, motive and effect" is at the heart of a comic affect (44) and in Dark Humor she uses this theory to analyze the humorous features of Twain's works and contends that there is disharmony and comic paradox in three respects.
El sentido del humor constituye una de las veinticuatro fortalezas humanas y se encuentra situado dentro de la virtud Trascendencia (Seligman, 2003).
HUMOR CAN HELP YOU DELIVER YOUR SAFETY MESSAGES MORE EFFECTIVELY
There are a number of perils that come with using humor in the classroom, though.
Certain forms of humor have been linked with fewer stress-related impacts (Besser et al.
Garner reiterated in separate studies, humor must be used in a purposeful, targeted way to increase learning.
No es de extranar, entonces, que la estructura factorial del instrumento aplicado en muestras culturalmente diferentes a la estadounidense, muestre que la forma de construir el sentido del humor es diferente en diferentes contextos.