humidity

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Related to humidities: absolute humidity

humidity

 [hu-mid´ĭ-te]
the degree of moisture in the air.
absolute humidity the actual amount of vapor in the atmosphere, expressed in milligrams per liter.
relative humidity the percentage of moisture in the air as compared to the amount necessary to cause saturation, which is taken as 100.
humidity therapy the therapeutic use of water to prevent or correct a moisture deficit in the respiratory tract. Under normal conditions the respiratory tract is kept moist by humidifying mechanisms that allow for evaporation of water from the respiratory mucosa. If these mechanisms fail to work, are bypassed (such as with an endotracheal tube), or are inadequate to overcome the drying and irritating effects of therapeutic gases and mucosal crusting, some form of humidification must be provided.

The principal reasons for employing humidity therapy are: (1) to prevent drying and irritation of the respiratory mucosa, (2) to facilitate ventilation and diffusion of oxygen and other therapeutic gases being administered, and (3) to aid in the removal of thick and viscous secretions that obstruct the air passages. Another important use of water aerosol therapy is to aid in obtaining an induced sputum specimen.

Humidity therapy may be delivered in a variety of ways. Humidifiers and vaporizers increase the water content of an environment and are limited to the treatment of upper respiratory disorders because they produce particles that are too large to penetrate deeply into the lungs. Nebulizers generate clouds or mists of particles that are extremely small and thus capable of penetrating more deeply into the bronchioles and small structures of the lower respiratory tract. Examples of these include jet instruments and ultrasonic nebulizers.

hu·mid·i·ty

(hyū-mid'i-tē),
Moisture or dampness, as of the air.
[L. humiditas, dampness]

humidity

[hyo̅o̅mid′itē]
Etymology: L, humidus, moist
the level of moisture in the atmosphere, which varies with the temperature. The percentage is usually represented in terms of relative humidity, with 100% the point of air saturation, or the level at which the air can absorb no additional water.

hu·mid·i·ty

(hyū-mid'i-tē)
Moisture or dampness, as of the air.
[L. humiditas, dampness]

hu·mid·i·ty

(hyū-mid'i-tē)
Moisture or dampness, as of the air.
[L. humiditas, dampness]

humidity

the degree of moisture in the air.

humidity therapy, humidification therapy
the therapeutic use of water to prevent or correct a moisture deficit in the respiratory tract. Under normal conditions the respiratory tract is kept moist by humidifying mechanisms that allow for evaporation of water from the respiratory mucosa. If these mechanisms fail to work, are bypassed as in endotracheal intubation, or are inadequate to overcome the drying and irritating effects of therapeutic gases and mucosal crusting, some form of humidification must be provided.
References in periodicals archive ?
The statistical analysis of the psocid populations growing on higher humidities showed that these were not statistically different (Table I, P>0.
Our results about psocids' preference of higher humidities are in agreement with many previously reports about psocids (Back, 1920; Rees and Walker, 1990; Mashaya, 2001; Nayak and Collins, 2008; Opit et al.
This is an important study regarding comparison of insect population growth with respect to different relative humidities and its comparison in different parts of growth chamber.
Population growth and development of Liposcelis pearmani (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae) at constant temperatures and relative humidities.
Population growth and development of the psocid Liposcelis rufa (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae) at constant temperatures and relative humidities.