humerus

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humerus

 [hu´mer-us] (pl. hu´meri) (L.)
the bone of the upper arm, extending from shoulder to elbow, consisting of a shaft and two enlarged extremities. The proximal end has a smooth round head that articulates with the scapula to form the shoulder joint. Just below the head are two rounded processes called the greater and lesser tubercles; the area just below the tubercles is called the “surgical neck,” because of its liability to fracture. The distal end of the humerus has two articulating surfaces: the trochlea, which articulates with the ulna, and the capitulum, which articulates with the radius at the elbow. and see Appendices.
Humerus. From Applegate, 2000.

hu·mer·us

, gen. and pl.

hu·mer·i

(hyū'mĕr-ŭs, -ī), [TA]
The bone of the arm, articulating with the scapula above and the radius and ulna below.
Synonym(s): arm bone
[L. shoulder]

humerus

/hu·mer·us/ (hu´mer-us) pl. hu´meri   [L.] the bone that extends from the shoulder to the elbow articulating proximally with the scapula and distally with the radius and ulna.hu´meral
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Anterior view of right humerus.

humerus

(hyo͞o′mər-əs)
n. pl. hu·meri (-mə-rī′)
The long bone of the arm or forelimb, extending from the shoulder to the elbow.

humerus

[hyo̅o̅′mərəs] pl. humeri
Etymology: L, shoulder
the bone of the upper arm, from the elbow to the shoulder joint where it articulates with the scapula. It comprises a body, a head, and two condyles. The body is almost cylindric proximally and prismatic and flattened distally and has two borders and three surfaces. The nearly hemispheric head articulates with the glenoid cavity of the scapula and has a constriction called the surgical neck, frequently the seat of a fracture. The condyles at the distal end have several features that articulate with the radius and ulna. Also called arm bone. humeral, adj.
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Humerus

hu·mer·us

(hyū'mĕr-ŭs) [TA]
The bone of the arm, articulating with the scapula above and the radius and ulna below.
[L. shoulder]

humerus

(hu'mer-us) [L. humerus, upper arm, shoulder]
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HUMERUS
The bone of the upper arm; it articulates with the scapula at the shoulder and with the ulna and radius at the elbow. See: illustration

anatomical neck of humerus

The constricted segment of the humerus between the head and the greater tubercle.

fracture of humerus

See: fracture.

humerus

The long upper arm bone that articulates at its upper end with a shallow cup in a side process of the shoulder blade (scapula) and, at its lower end with the RADIUS and ULNA bones of the lower arm.

humerus

the bone of the vertebrate forelimb (or arm) nearest to the body, to which it is attached at the shoulder. It is attached distally to the RADIUS and ULNA at the elbow.

Humerus

The bone of the upper arm.
Mentioned in: Osteomyelitis
Figure 1: The nervous system.

humerus

the bone of the upper arm, articulating at the shoulder joint with the scapula, and at the elbow joint with the ulna and radius. Figure 1.

humerus

the bone of the upper forelimb, extending from shoulder to elbow. It consists of a shaft and two enlarged extremities. The proximal end has a smooth round head that articulates with the scapula to form the shoulder joint. Just below the head are two rounded processes called the greater and lesser tubercles. The distal end of the humerus has a trochlea, which articulates with the ulna, and a capitulum, which articulates with the radius, at the elbow. See also Table 10.
Enlarge picture
Humerus of the dog. By permission from Aspinall V, O'Reilly M, Introduction to Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology, Butterworth Heinemann, 2004
References in periodicals archive ?
45 g, respectively, without the plastic bone sections, which is 30% to 50% heavier than the mean weight of the red-tailed hawk humeri collected for this study.
In this study, we address each of these issues for Kemp's ridley and loggerhead sea turtles by examining humeri from known-age animals.
Two good humeri, broken femur, broken tibia, scapula, pelvis, ribs, some vertebrae, foot bones, four teeth, etc.
Matching expectations, results indicate that bat humeri are longer and have greater CA relative to body mass than do the humeri of other mammals.
Other large bones included 34 ribs, both scapulae, both humeri, and parts of the radii and ulnae.
Initially, two leg bones were revealed but further excavation work has led to the pelvis, part of the spine and rib cage and parts of both humeri (arm bones) and some hand and finger bones being recovered.
Four femurs, four tibias, and two humeri were involved.
Findings that didn't fall into either category but were associated with an increased risk of aneuploidy included intrauterine growth restriction, short humeri, and an abnormal femur length to abdominal circumference ratio.
The lower portion of the skeleton was missing and while the upper part, including the skull, was relatively complete, the heads of a number of the bones, including those of the long humeri and ulnae from the arms, were bitten off postmortem.
All three cemented humeral long stems were tested in composite humeri; whereas, two of the humeral reconstruction prostheses were tested in composite humeri and three were tested in hollow aluminum pipe.
This scenario is supported by the distribution of cut marks (Figure 4): more than a third of eagle humeri show cut marks at their distal end, where the radius/ulna detach; the only eagle ulna present was cut at the distal end while another eagle-sized ulna showed cut marks on the shaft.
However, in size, it is similar to intact humeri of the bobcat and Canadian lynx (Lynx canadensis).