humanistic psychology


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hu·man·is·tic psy·chol·o·gy

an existential approach to psychology that emphasizes human uniqueness, subjectivity, and capacity for psychological growth.

humanistic psychology

a branch of psychology that emphasizes a person's struggle to develop and maintain an integrated, harmonious personality as the primary motivational force in human behavior. See also self-actualization.

humanistic psychology

Alternative psychology
A philosophy of psychotherapy which is based on a belief in a person’s intrinsic potential for personal growth and development. Central to humanistic psychology is the posit that a person is subject to multiple negative genetic, familial, environmental and social factors, which can be altered by attaining a positive attitude. Humanistic psychology eschews the “medical sickness” model and embraces one of mental growth and emancipation; humanistic psychotherpies are distinguished from both Freudian psychoanalysis and behaviourism (championed by BF Skinner).

Humanistic Psychotherapies  
• Client-oriented;  
• Constructivist;  
• Ericksonian;  
• Ethno-cultural;  
• Existential;  
• Experiential/Focusing;  
• Expressive arts;  
• Family process;  
• Feminist;  
• Gestalt;  
• Jungian/mythopoetic;  
• Narrative;  
• Primal integration;  
• Psychodrama;  
• Reichian/bioenergetics;  
• Self-in-relation; 
• Self-psychology; 
• Transactional analysis; 
• Transpersonal.

humanistic psychology

A school of psychology that views people as individuals responsible for, and in control of, their destinies and that emphasizes experience as the source of knowledge. It suggests that we can acquire insight into the inner life of another person by trying to see things from that person's own point of view.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Institute marked the beginning of its activities by the visit of Kirk Schneider from the USA, and his seminar in Birstonas in the early fall of 1996 became an expressive accent for all future activities, highlighting a connection to both the European tradition of existential therapy and American humanistic psychology.
Humanistic psychology as we know focuses on each individual's potential and stresses the importance of growth and self-actualization.
His most popular book, On Becoming a Person, was published in 1961 and was described in the New York Times as "a bible of the humanistic psychology movement.
Humanistic psychology led to the self-esteem movement and much else, reshaping the atmosphere in schools, human-resources departments and across American society.
The Society for Humanistic Psychology (Division 32 of the American Psychological Association) wrote an online open letter about similar concerns and garnered 15,000 individual signatures and the official support of 53 professional associations.
Mid-twentieth century humanistic psychology drew attention to the aesthetic sensibility--an ability to acknowledge and value experiences of beauty--as a hallmark of the well-developed adult personality.
Offering previously unpublished writings by Carl Rogers, the founder of humanistic psychology, this book places Rogers in conversation with his long-time student Harold Lyon (University of Massachusetts).
Correlational Analysis of Motivational Interviewing and Humanistic Psychology.
Emotionally-focused therapy is an integrated multiple-ground theory that embraces both the individual and the relational system (Johnson, 2004a): drawing upon general systems theory, cybernetics, structural family therapy, Attachment Theory, humanistic psychology, and neurobiology (Burgess Moser & Johnson, 2008; Greenberg & Johnson, 1988; Greenberg & Paivio, 1997; Johnson, 1996).
Some of those same concerns were expressed in an online petition posted by the Society for Humanistic Psychology (Division 32 of the American Psychological Association).
Frances also were expressed in an online open letter posted by the Society for Humanistic Psychology (Division 32 of the American Psychological Association).

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