bond

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bond

 [bond]
the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the symbol representing this linkage and indicating the number and attachment of the valencies of an atom in constitutional formulas, represented by a pair of dots or a line between atoms, e.g., H—O—H, H—C≡C—H or H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.
coordinate covalent bond a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond), or three pairs of electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond a strong covalent bond, —S—S—, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of the oxidation of the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high-energy phosphate bond an energy-rich phosphate linkage present in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine, and certain other biological molecules. On hydrolysis at pH 7 it yields about 8000 calories per mole, in contrast to the 3000 calories yielded by phosphate esters. The bond stores energy that is used to drive biochemical processes, such as the synthesis of macromolecules, contraction of muscles, and the production of the electrical potentials for nerve conduction.
high-energy sulfur bond an energy-rich sulfur linkage, the most important of which occurs in the acetyl-CoA molecule, the main source of energy in fatty acid biosynthesis.
hydrogen bond a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element (such as oxygen or nitrogen) in a given molecule, or part of a molecule, and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or in a different part of the same molecule.
ionic bond a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a positive and the other a negative charge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond the —CO—NH— linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is an amide linkage joining amino acids to form peptides.

bond

(bond),
chemistry the force holding two neighboring atoms in place and resisting their separation; a bond is electrovalent if it consists of the attraction between oppositely charged groups, or covalent if it results from the sharing of one, two, or three pairs of electrons by the bonded atoms.

bond

(bond) the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the mark indicating the number and attachment of the valences of an atom in constitutional formulas, represented by a pair of dots or a line between atoms, e.g., H—O—H, H—CtbondC—H or H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.
coordinate covalent bond  a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond  a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond), or three pairs of electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond  a strong covalent bond, —S—S—, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of the oxidation of the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high energy bond  a chemical bond the hydrolysis of which yields high levels of free energy; it may involve phosphate (high energy phosphate b.) or sulfur (high energy sulfur b.) or other mixed anhydride types of chemical structure.
hydrogen bond  a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element in a given molecule and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or elsewhere in the same molecule; it is usually represented by three dots, e.g., X—H···Y.
ionic bond  a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a negative and the other a positive charge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond  a —CO—NH— linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is an amide linkage joining amino acids to form peptides.

bond

a strong coulombic force between atoms in a substance due to attraction of ions of opposite charge for each other or of the nuclei for shared electrons. See also coulomb, Coulomb's law.
Chemistry A unit of chemical attraction; the ‘glue’ that maintains the molecules in their 3-D configuration—e.g., O2 has 2 bonds of affinity, which may be graphically represented by a short line or dash
Social medicine A binding force or influence; a cause of union; a uniting tie—e.g., bonds of fellowship

bond

(bond)
chemistry The force holding two neighboring atoms in place and resisting their separation; a bond is electrovalent if it consists of the attraction between oppositely charged groups, or covalent if it results from the sharing of one, two, or three pairs of electrons by the bonded atoms.

bond

  1. the force of mutual attraction that holds atoms together in molecules (see VAN DER WAALS INTERACTIONS and SULPHUR BRIDGE), such as high-energy bonds in ATP, weak hydrogen bonds in DNA, PEPTIDE BONDS and the disulphide bond of proteins.
  2. also called pair bond . The attraction which maintains a male/female relationship, for purposes of breeding, during the life cycle of some animals, mainly warmblooded vertebrates.

bond,

n the attachment between the atoms in a molecule that is determined by the arrangement of electrons in the outer shell of the atom. See also covalent bond and ionic bonding.

bond

(bond)
chemistry the force holding two neighboring atoms in place and resisting their separation.

bond

the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the symbol representing this linkage and indicating the number and attachment of the valencies of an atom in constitutional formulas, e.g. H−O−H, H−C= C−H and can be represented by a pair of dots between atoms, e.g. H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.

coordinate covalent bond
a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond
a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond) or three pairs of electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond
a strong covalent bond, −S−S−, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of the oxidation of the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high-energy phosphate bond
an energy-rich phosphate linkage present in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine and certain other biological molecules. On hydrolysis at pH 7 it yields about 8000 calories per mole, in contrast to the 3000 calories yielded by phosphate esters. The bond stores energy that is used to drive biochemical processes, such as the synthesis of macromolecules, contraction of muscles, and the production of the electrical potentials for nerve conduction.
high-energy sulfur bond
an energy-rich sulfur linkage, the most important of which occurs in the acetyl-CoA molecule, the main source of energy in fatty acid biosynthesis.
human-animal bond
the psychological interdependence between humans and companion animals.
hydrogen bond
a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element (such as oxygen or nitrogen) in a given molecule, or part of a molecule, and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or in a different part of the same molecule.
ionic bond
a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a positive and the other a negative charge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond
the −CO−NH− linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is an amide linkage joining amino acids to form peptides.
phosphoanhydride bond
a high energy bond present in ATP.
phosphodiester bond
links between nucleotides in nucleic acids.
References in periodicals archive ?
Understanding the legal, professional, and common definitions of these types of animals will help providers deliver the best care and develop appropriate policy to maximize the tangible and intangible benefits of the human-animal bond.
Having established the psychosocial, medical, and potential marketing benefits of the human-animal bond, it is now time to turn to the need for research within the workplace.
Through an understanding of the human-animal bond and application of grief theory, the grief counselor was able to help Bob and Sue gain insight into their unique grief processes.
Interest in this field grew rapidly with the formation of the Delta Society in 1981, along with international membership and influence, leading to recognized benefits of human-animal bond interactions being accepted by the healthcare professions.
Pet industry growth demonstrates that the human-animal bond is stronger than ever.
People have long wondered about the circumstances that led prehistoric dogs to come, sit, and permanently stay, thus creating the first human-animal bond.
She also serves on the Board of Directors for Fidelco Guide Dog Foundation and the American Association of Human-Animal Bond Veterinarians.
The human-animal bond is stronger than ever, but we are very concerned that pets may not be getting the preventive health care they need.
Their future, Berg told them, is bright in spite of the poor economy, owing to something that's changed the whole profession in the nearly 30 years he's been in it: the strength of the human-animal bond.

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