human monocytic ehrlichiosis


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human monocytic ehrlichiosis

human monocytic ehrlichiosis

Infectious disease An infection by Ehrlichia chaffeensis Vector Lone Star tick–Amblyomma americanum, possibly also Dermacentor variabilis Reservoir Deer, possibly dogs or others Regions US, Europe, Africa Clinical Fever, malaise, headache, myalgia, rigors, sweating, anorexia, arthralgia, N&V, pharyngitis, rash, cough, diarrhea; with progression of HME, fever, headache, myalgia, anorexia, and arthralgia become more intense Lab CSF pleocytosis, E chaffeensis inclusions in monocytes, spleen and other tissues, BM hyperplasia–58%, hypoplasia–17% Diagnosis Romanovsky stains of circulating monocytes, EM, indirect immunofluorescence, PCR Complications Meningitis, interstitial pneumonia, GI and pulmonary hemorrhage, disseminated hemorrhage. Cf Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis.

hu·man mon·o·cyt·ic ehr·lich·i·o·sis

(HME) (hyū'măn mon'ō-sit'ik er-lik'ē-ō'sis)
A febrile disease caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis and transmitted by the Lone Star tick (Amblyomma americanum); similar to human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, except that inclusions are found in monocytes.
References in periodicals archive ?
About 2% to 3% of human monocytic ehrlichiosis cases, 7% of human granulocytic anaplasmosis cases, and 5% to 10% of Ehr.
Multiorgan failure related to human monocytic ehrlichiosis.
chaffeensis in Costa Rica are unknown, and further ecologic studies are required to determine these aspects of human monocytic ehrlichiosis in Central America.
Myocarditis associated with human monocytic ehrlichiosis is distinctly uncommon.
The buffy-coat smear performed 4 days after illness onset showed basophilic intracytoplasmic inclusions inside vacuoles of lymphocytes and monocytes, with typical features of morulae reported for human monocytic ehrlichiosis (Figure).
Recognition and emergence of human tickborne ehrlichiosis are recent and continuing events, beginning with human monocytic ehrlichiosis and human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, reported first in the United States in 1987 and 1994, respectively.
ewingii, agents of human monocytic ehrlichiosis and ehrlichiosis ewingii, respectively, are transmitted by the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum, which is found from west-central Texas northward to Iowa, and southeastward to the Atlantic Coast (1).
Manifestations of human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME), a tick-borne infection caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, range from asymptomatic disease to fulminant.
The two main pathogenic species are Ehrlichia chaffeensis, which causes human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME), and the as-yet-unnamed agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) (4).
The increasing deer population and expanding tick distribution may increase risk for human monocytic ehrlichiosis.
canis in humans (2) and human granulocytic ehrlichiosis as human monocytic ehrlichiosis in areas where the vector was not present (3).
The conclusions meet the criteria published by the American Society for Rickettsiology, in which a confirmed diagnosis of human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME) is based on a "single serum titer of 256" in a patient with clinically compatible disease (5).

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