human ecology


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hu·man e·col·o·gy

the relations of people to their total (biologic and social) environment.

human ecology

n.
The branch of sociology that is concerned with studying the relationships between human groups and their physical and social environments.

human ecology

the study of the interrelationships between people and their environments, as well as among individuals within an environment.

hu·man e·col·o·gy

(hyū'măn ē-kol'ŏ-jē)
The study and science of the natural world as related to Homo sapiens and the place of the species within the world.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Our hope is for human ecology to be recognized for its unique and important role in agricultural and rural development,' he added.
And when Geddes teaches the popular class Regulation and Infrastructure Policy, Cornell Engineering students routinely fill the seats next to their Human Ecology peers.
Students in the School of Advanced Military Studies (SAMS) applied the human ecology frame during a Design and Joint Operations Planning exercise.
My preliminary aim is to show how to approach reasonably complex problems in the general area of human ecology, involving biological, social cultural, ethical, economical, and political dimensions.
Environmental health, ecology and health, and human ecology each provides constructs applicable to public health interventions at different scales of temporal, spatial, and conceptual complexity.
The most likely allergen lurking in magazine and newspaper print is the ink, according to the Human Ecology Action League (HEAL), a nonprofit that focuses on environmentally related health issues.
The report published by the Centre for Human Ecology in Edinburgh will be sent to MSPs.
was compiled by the Edinburgh-based Centre for Human Ecology and has been sent to every MSP.
Applications are now being accepted for the Hazel Taylor Spitze Doctoral Fellowship in Family and Consumer Science Education, sponsored by the College of Human Ecology at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville.
In this population, proposers prove much stingier, and responders more tolerant, than their counterparts in industrialized societies, Henrich reports in an upcoming Human ECOLOGY.
The author of this book is the director of the Human Ecology Group at the Swiss Federal Institute for Environmental Science and Technology in Zurich.
His work is about human ecology in the broadest sense including adaptations to both natural and social environments.