human cloning


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The at-present hypothetical, but ethically charged production of a de novo human from the DNA of one person without the genetic contribution from a second human. It should be noted that identical twins are a natural example of cloning that doesn’t engender the polarising polemic of unnatural cloning, the latter of which many view as playing God. The implications and ethical dilemmas that might result from having a ‘copy’ of a particular individual are considerable, which prompted Congress (the Ehlers bill) and the Senate (the Bond-Frist bill) to create legislation that would prevent same; some scientists have noted the potential usefulness of human cloning, in particular, for growing tissues—e.g., stem cells, pancreatic tissue, epithelial cells, et al—to treat diabetes, leukemia, burns, etc. Human cloning could also potentially allow donor tissues from a person’s own DNA, obviating tissue incompatibility

human cloning

The production of a person genetically identical to another person by the insertion of a genome from a somatic cell into an ovum from which the DNA has been removed (somatic cell nuclear transfer). Human cloning is currently almost universally proscribed. At the present time it is also scientifically unfeasible. Because nuclear cloning bypasses the normal processes of gametogenesis and fertilization, it prevents the reprogramming of the clone's genome necessary for the development of an embryo into a normal human being. There is evidence that surviving cloned animals have serious abnormalities of gene expression.
References in periodicals archive ?
The new NIH guidelines would not authorize NIH funding for research on human embryos who were deliberately created to be used in research, whether by IVF or by human cloning.
The initiative would amend the Missouri Constitution to prohibit the practice of human cloning, and would prohibit taxpayer funding of human cloning experiments.
This collection of essays gives extensive insight into the debate about human cloning.
Q: You have stated that the debate on stem cell research and human cloning comes down to "whose life matters most: the lives of sick children and adults facing risks of decay and premature death, or the lives of human embryos who must be directly destroyed in the process of harvesting their stem cells for research.
1) In 2001, the head of the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research told a congressional subcommittee that the agency would regulate human cloning and that safety issues would prevent the agency from approving human cloning attempts at this time.
Upfront spoke to Ronald Green, an ethicist at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, about human cloning.
The Raelian sect's claim has increased pressure on the 170 countries that have no laws to ban human cloning.
AN expert in medical law has said that the Government will have to enact legislation to deal with human cloning in Ireland.
Clonaid, the first human cloning company, was founded in 1997, right after Scottish scientists announced the birth of Dolly the sheep, the first mammal to be cloned from an adult.
ARCHBISHOP RENATO MARTINO, the then-representative of the Vatican at the United Nations, has suggested that human cloning may pave the way for "a new form of racism, for the development of these techniques could lead to the creation of a `subcategory of human beings,' destined basically for the convenience of others.
3) His contention is that the vociferous outpouring of opposition to human cloning after Dolly went beyond moral reasoning.

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