huitlacoche


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huitlacoche

(wēt′lä-kō′chā)
n.
Variant of cuitlacoche.
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References in periodicals archive ?
More importantly for Paz's metaphorical structure, chocolate is--like huitlacoche and blue corn tortillas --una comida sombria, if one that has been more naturalized into western diets than the other dark-colored foods he mentions.
Y no estoy hablando solo del chile, porque mi prima Gra, que emigro de la ciudad a Quintana Roo, dice que extranaba como loca el huitlacoche, y mi prima Victoria, que vivio 6 anos en Merida, cuenta que cuando invito a unas senoras y les dio nopalitos, muchas de ellas le dijeron: <<
The sabana azteca (pressed, boneless chicken wrapped around spinach and chile poblano smothered in a huitlacoche sauce) and el especial .
Next year, she wants to grow huitlacoche, commonly known as corn smut and considered a great delicacy in Mexico, where it is known as corn mushroom.
Would never eat: Huitlacoche, or corn smut, a fungus that grows on corn stalks.
There was black huitlacoche (a fungus that grow on ears of corn, known today as the `black gold' of Mexican cuisine), orange papaya, pink mamey, and every kind of chilli pepper ranging in colour from yellow to red, green and black.
market for this latest ethnic food fad known by its Latin taxonym, ustilago maydis, but more commonly by its Nahuatl name, huitlacoche.
Although Bayless cautions against putting the most exotic items on the menu right away, he notes in his book that Huitlacoche is a surprise hit at Topolobampo.
Interesting recent notations include the harvesting by the Seri of the seed of eelgrass, a unique utilization of a marine resource, and Flora Banuetts' recipes for the maize fungus huitlacoche (Ustilago maydis) in Maya-Aztec-modern Mexican cookery.
It is the policies which prevent peasants from sowing corn, and the abandonment of land which could produce huitlacoche (a highly regarded fungus which is an important part of traditional diets) and other by-products in the milpa, or traditional corn field.
Braised beef tenderloin stuffed with huitlacoche with a Chihuahua cheese and chili sauce - Chef Luis Zarate Coronado, Mexico;
The menu at O'Toole's Tore harmoniously roams the world, with dishes like Indian sweet-potato pakora, Japanese hamachi crudo, and heritage porchetta with Mexican huitlacoche (a mushroomlike fungus).