huitlacoche


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huitlacoche

(wēt′lä-kō′chā)
n.
Variant of cuitlacoche.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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More importantly for Paz's metaphorical structure, chocolate is--like huitlacoche and blue corn tortillas --una comida sombria, if one that has been more naturalized into western diets than the other dark-colored foods he mentions.
Huitlacoche: An inky-colored, earthy-sweet corn mushroom that is a delicacy in Central Mexico.
Masa harina (corn flour) elote (cooked or barbecued sweetcorn) huitlacoche (corn truffle a mushroom like fungus) as well as the corn husk used envelope-like in tamales-each plays a vital role in North and South Americas pre-eminent favorite most historic food type.
From Squash Blossom Roasted Corn Huitlacoche Soup; Young Spinach and Goat Cheese Salad; Roasted Chilean Sea Bass; and Texas Pecan-Crusted Chicken Skewers; to Texas Home Fries; Honey Lavender Ice Cream; Chocolate and Roasted pepper Cheesecake; and Barbecue Pepper Glaze, each of these 'kitchen cook friendly' recipes would grace any dining occasion with gourmet quality meals.
She paints a pitiful picture: This "highly insecure" existence includes two residences (an apartment in Brooklyn and a house in Vermont), flexible work that allows the couple to take off and ski in the afternoon, three cars, a windsurfer, and a healthy diet of such Whole Foods staples as "Thai sweet black rice" and "Mexican huitlacoche fungus."
The sabana azteca (pressed, boneless chicken wrapped around spinach and chile poblano smothered in a huitlacoche sauce) and el especial ...
Next year, she wants to grow huitlacoche, commonly known as corn smut and considered a great delicacy in Mexico, where it is known as corn mushroom.
Would never eat: Huitlacoche, or corn smut, a fungus that grows on corn stalks.
Young white galls can be eaten after cooking (called "huitlacoche" in nahuat, Mexico; e.
market for this latest ethnic food fad known by its Latin taxonym, ustilago maydis, but more commonly by its Nahuatl name, huitlacoche.