houseman

(redirected from houseboy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

houseman

A term of art referring to either a junior houseman in the UK, a pre-registration house office (PRHO) the first year of training after graduating from medical school, now known as Foundation Year 1 (FY1), or a senior houseman or senior house officer (SHO), the second year after medical school, now FY2.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ardis makes careful lists in handwriting that does not waver, composes intricate menus with many courses for the houseboy, at the market requests perfect produce in firm tones.
Both children liked being around Nigerians and followed the houseboy and cook everywhere.
Mason works for the Arabian American Oil Company (Aramco) and means that the couple is suddenly living in great wealth, in a massive house in a gated compound with a 'houseboy' to serve Gin's every whim.
The invisible status that has been awarded to maids seems to make them objects of servitude with "no name, no past, no future, no desire or need." Hilariously, though, when Latha is bogged down by such politics, she finds the best antidote is lime juice made with extra sugar--one for herself and one for the houseboy.
Little Eileen substitutes for the recently departed Yukie, a Japanese houseboy hauled away to one of California's concentration camps.
He can join Gareth Gates, Shayne Ward and the other one, you know, the Scottish one, as Cowell''s houseboy, throwing pounds 50 notes on the fire on his behalf.
Madan Lakshmanan Kherade, an Indian, working as a Houseboy at the Fujairah Palace, and Shoukat Parvez, a Pakistani driver working in Sharjah, have won AED 1 million ($272,285) each through the ongoing Ramadan Recharge promotion from Etisalat.
Kherade, working as a houseboy at the Fujairah Palace and Parvez, a driver in Sharjah, won Dh1 million ($272236) each through the ongoing Ramadan recharge promotion from Etisalat.
He took a job as a houseboy for people who lived a mile from the state capitol in Olympia.
Nigerian writer Adichie tells the story of Biafra's struggle for independence in the late '60s through the lives of five characters, primarily a 13-year-old houseboy named Ugwu.
(My friend Christine plans to share her home with other women who will pool their retirement funds to hire a Chippendale dancer as a houseboy.)
Thirteen year old Ugwu, a poor houseboy from a remote Nigerian village, is forced to fight and survive in the Biafran army.