house organ


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house organ

a publication designed for distribution to the employees or members of an institution or business. It may be prepared by a staff within the institution or business or by an outside agency.

house or·gan

(hows ōr'găn)
A colloquial term used to describe a publication offering news of a business or institution (e.g., hospital); now largely supplanted by online services and Web sites.
References in periodicals archive ?
Convincing volunteer leaders that an association magazine must - and can - be more than a house organ can be a formidable challenge for the chief executive officer.
When journalists become part of the show, it lowers their credibility to that of a house organ for special interests.
Einosuke Akiya, head of Soka Gakkai, Japan's lay Buddhist organization and parent body of the New Komeito, said in its Tuesday house organ, "An alliance with the LDP is one of the options if their policies coincide.
Today RAI even has its own political party, aptly called "Partito RAI," which is supported by Deputy Prime Minister Walter Veltroni, a former Communist and former editor of L'Unita (the house organ of the former Communist party, now the PDS party).
It has chosen to feature its recently-acquired ProMag magnetic patch systems in its house organ, Hepaco Hazmatters, for Spring 2003.
For such Catholics, a diocesan paper is merely a house organ, the bishop's vehicle by which he communicates with his flock and insures that they will be exposed to no ideas, opinions or even news stories that might "disturb" their faith or lead them to question church teachings and policies.
PP: Somebody once called Artforum "the house organ for Manimalism.
com is viewed by consumers and the industry as unbiased and not just a house organ for a PR firm, TransMedia clients will be labeled as such in the publication whenever they or their products are featured editorially, she added.
At the 1915 convention of the Advertising Clubs of the World, held in Chicago, the Association of House Organ Editors (AHOE) was formed.
This new weekly prided itself on confronting power in all of its forms, conventions, and guises and soon became not only an exemplar of the New Journalism, but what one staffer called "the house organ of the world.
resigned" after complaining that Archbishop Daniel Cronin had compromised their journalistic integrity and that their managing editor, a priest (always a priest), had turned their newspaper into a house organ.
Independent newsletters fought to establish that they and their reporters were similar to newspaper reporters, not house organ and trade association employees--and they won.