roaster

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roaster

a young fowl for eating; weighs 5 to 7 lb at 6 months of age.
References in periodicals archive ?
By studying it, we are able to test theories of hot Jupiter formation.
There are other hot Jupiters that have been found to be remarkably black, but they are much cooler than WASP-12b.
Only two years ago, hot Jupiters were assumed to migrate gently inward from the outskirts of their planetary system and quickly settle into sedate, circular orbits that would keep them well away from the zone in which terrestrial planets could form.
These compounds are expected to be present in only the hottest of hot Jupiters, such as WASP-121b, as high temperatures are required to keep them in the gaseous state.
Meanwhile, Jean-Francois Donati (University of Toulouse, France) and colleagues announced another discovery, also published in the June 30th Nature: a hot Jupiter orbiting a stellar infant, the 2-million-year-old V830 Tauri.
The planet, known as HD 189733b, is a hot Jupiter, meaning it is similar in size to Jupiter in our solar system but in very close orbit around its star.
This so-called hot Jupiter, known as Upsilon Andromedae b, orbits its parent star at only about a tenth of the distance that Mercury resides from the sun.
The object neither is a Hot Jupiter nor does it circle a pulsar.
Scientists found the hot Jupiter NGTS-1b by spotting it as it was passing in front of its own dwarf, from the vantage point of Earth.
Using the Hubble Space Telescope, Korey Haynes (NASA Goddard) and colleagues found tantalizing traces of the heavy-duty absorber titanium oxide on the hot Jupiter WASP-33b, as reported in June 20th's Astrophysical Journal.
These hot Jupiter planets are expected to have a vastly different composition from planets in our own Solar System like Jupiter, where temperatures at the cloud tops are around -150 degrees Celsius," Catherine Huitson of the University of Exeter, said.
Each planet would have to have been a so-called hot Jupiter, a body as massive as our solar system's giant planet but that circles the star at only about a tenth of the distance between Mercury and the sun.