host-parasite relationship

host-parasite relationship

may be at any one of a series of classified levels in two groups, those of disease and symbiosis. In the disease category there are velogenic, mesogenic and lentigenic.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, drills on Bioko Island have been separated from contact with drills on the mainland for 10,000-12,000 years (9), further isolating the ecology of this host-parasite relationship and confusing how C.
This further supports the conclusion that this host-parasite relationship might have important consequences for individual fitness, as well as overall population dynamics in the western mosquitofish.
Knowing which genes turn on at specific stages of the infection cycle will better explain the host-parasite relationship and may lead toward new treatments for this disease.
He is particularly attracted to recasting existing buildings, conceptualizing existing and new as a host-parasite relationship, looking for nuances and eccentricities in the host that will shape the parasite',* as Carter and LeCuyer note.
Host-parasite relationship of the copepod eye parasite, Phrixocephalus cincinnatus, and Pacific sanddab (Citharichthys sordidus) collected from wastewater outfall areas.
A sampling of topics: mining bacterial cell division and bacterial secretion systems for new antibacterial drugs, recent developments in natural products and their potential impact on antibacterial drug discovery, biosynthetic engineering, indigenous human microbiota, and novel targets related to the host-parasite relationship in tuberculosis.
Recently, however, there has been an emphasis on examining the ecology of larval trematode infection dynamics in the molluscan intermediate host as a means of further understanding this host-parasite relationship (e.
Host-parasite relationship between Utah juniper and juniper mistletoe in the Spring Mountains of southern Nevada.
Their rationale for proposing Choleoeimeria was based solely on the mode of endogenous development in the gall bladder, which involved a "unique form" of host-parasite relationship whereby there is hypertrophy and displacement of the host cell.
This reflects, as the editors note, a newfound intellectual energy born of the successful (albeit fledgling) applications of molecular genetic techniques to the study of the host-parasite relationship in schistosomiasis.
Drawing on the Plasmodium Genome Database, international multidisciplinary contributors to 27 chapters review the latest understanding of its genetics, the host-parasite relationship, immune system invasion and responses, and mechanism of antimalarial agents.