host cell


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Related to host cell: plasmid, Host range

host cell

a cell (for example, a bacterium) in which a vector can be propagated.

host cell

(hōst sel)
A cell (e.g., a bacterium) in which a vector can be propagated.

host cell

(hōst sel)
Cell (e.g., a bacterium) in which a vector can be propagated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mitochondria can become damaged and dysfunctional when necessary nutrients are not available from the gut, when the energy created by mitochondria is less than the free radicals they produce, and when mitochondria are unable to repair themselves or increase their numbers in their host cell. Also, specific environmental elements and medications can be toxic to mitochondria.
Bacterial pathogens damage host cells by multiple mechanisms.
Caption: The Ebola virus hijacks a protein called NPC1 to invade a host cell, as seen in this illustration.
By boosting the amount of proteins produced by the hosts' cells, this method might invoke a stronger immune response in patients receiving a DNA vaccine and, by making smaller vaccine doses possible, it also might reduce the risk that the patients immune system inadvertently would attack healthy host cells.
To avoid host cell defense mechanisms, merozoites bud from detached hepatocytes in merosomes [4, 47], which are covered with host cell-derived membranes [48].
The level of autophagy may impact its biological effects on host cells. Autophagy could restrict Salmonella growth in the host cells.
Host cell capture-quantitative sequence detection of potentially infectious viruses.
As the OMV-membrane should consist mainly of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and host cell plasma membrane mainly of phospholipids, any fusion between them is likely to be assisted by some specialized proteins/receptors.
In order to elucidate the mode of antiviral action, cells and viruses were incubated together during adsorption; cells were pretreated with extracts before viral infection; viruses were incubated with extracts before cell infection; or after penetration of the virus into the host cell it was treated with extract.
It regulates the pH of the viral core after virus uptake into the host cell's endosomal compartment during initiation of infection and subsequently of vesicles that transport the viral transmembrane proteins to the cell surface during the late stage of infection.
Once a virus has injected its DNA into a host cell, it multiplies into more viruses that go on to invade more cells.
Hyphae were also seen penetrating the host cell wall and extending into the intercellular spaces.