hospital-acquired pneumonia


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hospital-acquired pneumonia

pneumonia in a patient in a hospital, or hospital-like setting, such as a rehabilitation facility. Often caused by gram-negative or staphylococcal organisms.

hospital-acquired pneumonia

Nosocomial pneumonia Infectious disease Pulmonary infection acquired during a hospital stay which is often more severe than community-acquired pneumonia Risk factors Immune compromise, alcoholism, elderly, aspiration due to intubation. Cf Community-acquired pneumonia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the pneumonia cases, the most common type of pneumonia was hospital-acquired pneumonia (44%), followed by aspiration pneumonia (41%).
Hospital-acquired pneumonia in adults: diagnosis, assessment of severity, initial antimicrobial therapy, and preventive strategies.
Every additional patient per RN per shift was associated with a 7% increase in relative risk of hospital-acquired pneumonia, a 53% increase in pulmonary failure, a 45% increase in unplanned extubation, and a 17% increase in medical complications.
The chest x-ray was repeated, which showed consolidation in the right apical zone, which was treated as a hospital-acquired pneumonia with Inj.
She said nurses showed "resentment, indifference and even contempt" towards Owen Roberts, 73, before he died of hospital-acquired pneumonia in October.
Pneumonia was traditionally classified as either community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) or hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), but in 2005 the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) introduced the concept of healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP).
A recent study found a 15% reduction in the probability of hospital-acquired pneumonia after chest trauma if patients received hydrocortisone therapy (JAMA 2011;305:1242-3).
Alter admission, Pamela developed hospital-acquired pneumonia, an infection in her blood stream that may have been the product of a perforated intestine, and anemia.
Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is significantly more common than hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), with an estimated 4 million to 5 million cases per year.
The novel and interesting thing from this study is that these findings are consistent with the emerging theme linking oral bacteria (and therefore, potentially, the oral microbiome) to pneumonia risk in many different clinical settings - not only hospital-acquired pneumonia and ventilator-associated pneumonia, but now potentially .

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