hospice

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Related to hospices: Hospice care

hospice

 [hos´pis]
originally, a medieval guest house or way station for pilgrims and travelers. The term is currently used to designate either a place or a philosophy of care for persons in the last stages of life and their families. For decades there have been hospices in England, free-standing facilities unaffiliated with hospitals and autonomous in terms of professional procedures. These hospices were the predecessors of the hospices now found in the United States.

A hospice program provides palliative and supportive care for terminally ill patients and their families. The concept of hospice is that of a caring community of professional and nonprofessional people, supplemented by volunteer services. The emphasis is on dealing with emotional and spiritual problems as well as medical problems. Of primary concern is control of pain and other symptoms, on keeping the patient at home for as long as possible or desirable, and on making his or her remaining days as comfortable and meaningful as possible. After the patient dies family members are given support throughout their period of bereavement.

hos·pice

(hos'pis),
An institution that provides a centralized program of palliative and supportive services to dying people and their families, in the form of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual care; such services are provided by an interdisciplinary team of professionals and volunteers who are available in the home and in specialized inpatient settings.
[L. hospitium, hospitality, lodging, fr. hospes, guest]

hospice

/hos·pice/ (hos´pis) a facility that provides palliative and supportive care for terminally ill patients and their families, either directly or on a consulting basis.

hospice

(hŏs′pĭs)
n.
1. A shelter or lodging for travelers, pilgrims, foundlings, or the destitute, especially one maintained by a monastic order.
2. A program that provides palliative care and attends to the emotional and spiritual needs of terminally ill patients at an inpatient facility or at the patient's home.

hospice

[hos′pis]
Etymology: L, hospes, host
a system of family-centered care designed to assist the terminally ill person to be comfortable and to maintain quality of life through the phases of dying. Hospice care is multidisciplinary and includes home visits, professional health care available on call, teaching and emotional support of the family, and physical care of the client. Some hospice programs provide care in a center, as well as in the home or in a nursing home. Hospice also offers bereavement counseling for the family. See also emotional care of the dying patient, stages of dying.

hospice

A residential or institutional palliative care unit in the UK which provides planned, co-ordinated, multidisciplinary care for the terminally ill and their carers. Hospices are often run by charitable organisations with which NHS Boards may have contractual arrangements for providing patient care.

Services provided
Inpatient and day care, home care, respite care and specialist advice.

Professions associated with hospices
Medical, nursing, allied health professionals, social work and chaplains/ministers of religion.

hospice

Managed care An institution which provides comfort care and a combination of inpatient, outpatient, and home health services–pain relief, symptom management and support, for terminally ill Pts (and their families) with CA, AIDS and other dread diseases. See Comfort care.

hos·pice

(hos'pis)
An institution that provides a centralized program of palliative and supportive services to dying patients and their families, in the form of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual care; such services are provided by an interdisciplinary team of professionals and volunteers who are available to provide assistance at home and in specialized inpatient settings.
[L. hospitium, hospitality, lodging, fr. hospes, guest]

hospice

A hospital specializing in the care of the terminally ill. Hospices are dedicated to providing the physical, emotional and psychological support and expert pain management needed to help the dying to accept the reality of death and to die in dignity and peace of mind.

hospice,

n system for care of a patient during the final phases of a terminal illness, often involving family, emotional support, and professional health care in the patient's home.

hos·pice

(hos'pis)
Institution that provides a centralized program of palliative and supportive services to dying people and their families, in the form of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual care.
[L. hospitium, hospitality, lodging, fr. hospes, guest]

hospice (hos´pis),

n a program under medical direction and nurse coordination that provides a variety of inpatient and home care for individuals who are terminally ill and their family members; provides calming and accommodating care that meets the special needs arising from the variety of stresses experienced during the final phases of illness, death, and grieving (e.g., emotional, physical, social, economic, and spiritual).
References in periodicals archive ?
At Butterwick Hospice we stretch the funds we receive as far as they will go in order to provide excellence of care for every person who comes for help.
This acquisition further enhances Hospice Source's customer base and market position in Texas.
Since the partnership began, Carillion project and office locations have been teaming up with the hospice most local to them to hold fundraising events as well as volunteering and skills match activities.
Harbor Light Hospice's decision to sponsor a local family in Dalton, Georgia is a perfect example of a hospice provider making the extra effort to support the local community while simultaneously disseminating the hospice mission in a positive way.
The Institute of Medicine (IOM)'s Dying in America Report recommends a hospice approach because it is patient-centered, family-oriented and evidence-based, but in the IOM report there are many testimonials from families who could not get hospice until very late.
Both the Welsh Labour Government and our Health Board should instead be asking our hospices how they can help deliver more, saving the Welsh NHS money and delivering better care for patients, their families and carers.
He said: "Two years ago, WRMCL donated PS20,000 to national charity Lifelites to enable them to provide specialist fun and educational technology at Forget Me Not hospice.
CEO of St David's Hospice Care, Emma Saysell, believes these figures demonstrate clearly how indispensable hospice care has become to a huge number of people and importantly how it will continue to provide crucial care and support in the future.
Other Hospices to benefit are: St Mary's Hospice, Birmingham - PS214,362; Compton Hospice (Cedars Site), Wolverhampton - PS510,000; Mary Stevens Hospice, Stourbridge - PS509,127; Primrose Hospice, Bromsgrove - PS503,200;
St Joseph's Hospice Association in Sefton was given PS567,800.
Hospices help seriously ill people to make each day count by providing home care, family support, complementary therapies, pain relief, counselling, art therapy, physiotherapy and lots more.

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