hospice


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hospice

 [hos´pis]
originally, a medieval guest house or way station for pilgrims and travelers. The term is currently used to designate either a place or a philosophy of care for persons in the last stages of life and their families. For decades there have been hospices in England, free-standing facilities unaffiliated with hospitals and autonomous in terms of professional procedures. These hospices were the predecessors of the hospices now found in the United States.

A hospice program provides palliative and supportive care for terminally ill patients and their families. The concept of hospice is that of a caring community of professional and nonprofessional people, supplemented by volunteer services. The emphasis is on dealing with emotional and spiritual problems as well as medical problems. Of primary concern is control of pain and other symptoms, on keeping the patient at home for as long as possible or desirable, and on making his or her remaining days as comfortable and meaningful as possible. After the patient dies family members are given support throughout their period of bereavement.

hos·pice

(hos'pis),
An institution that provides a centralized program of palliative and supportive services to dying people and their families, in the form of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual care; such services are provided by an interdisciplinary team of professionals and volunteers who are available in the home and in specialized inpatient settings.
[L. hospitium, hospitality, lodging, fr. hospes, guest]

hospice

/hos·pice/ (hos´pis) a facility that provides palliative and supportive care for terminally ill patients and their families, either directly or on a consulting basis.

hospice

(hŏs′pĭs)
n.
1. A shelter or lodging for travelers, pilgrims, foundlings, or the destitute, especially one maintained by a monastic order.
2. A program that provides palliative care and attends to the emotional and spiritual needs of terminally ill patients at an inpatient facility or at the patient's home.

hospice

[hos′pis]
Etymology: L, hospes, host
a system of family-centered care designed to assist the terminally ill person to be comfortable and to maintain quality of life through the phases of dying. Hospice care is multidisciplinary and includes home visits, professional health care available on call, teaching and emotional support of the family, and physical care of the client. Some hospice programs provide care in a center, as well as in the home or in a nursing home. Hospice also offers bereavement counseling for the family. See also emotional care of the dying patient, stages of dying.

hospice

A residential or institutional palliative care unit in the UK which provides planned, co-ordinated, multidisciplinary care for the terminally ill and their carers. Hospices are often run by charitable organisations with which NHS Boards may have contractual arrangements for providing patient care.

Services provided
Inpatient and day care, home care, respite care and specialist advice.

Professions associated with hospices
Medical, nursing, allied health professionals, social work and chaplains/ministers of religion.

hospice

Managed care An institution which provides comfort care and a combination of inpatient, outpatient, and home health services–pain relief, symptom management and support, for terminally ill Pts (and their families) with CA, AIDS and other dread diseases. See Comfort care.

hos·pice

(hos'pis)
An institution that provides a centralized program of palliative and supportive services to dying patients and their families, in the form of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual care; such services are provided by an interdisciplinary team of professionals and volunteers who are available to provide assistance at home and in specialized inpatient settings.
[L. hospitium, hospitality, lodging, fr. hospes, guest]

hospice

A hospital specializing in the care of the terminally ill. Hospices are dedicated to providing the physical, emotional and psychological support and expert pain management needed to help the dying to accept the reality of death and to die in dignity and peace of mind.

hospice,

n system for care of a patient during the final phases of a terminal illness, often involving family, emotional support, and professional health care in the patient's home.

hos·pice

(hos'pis)
Institution that provides a centralized program of palliative and supportive services to dying people and their families, in the form of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual care.
[L. hospitium, hospitality, lodging, fr. hospes, guest]

hospice (hos´pis),

n a program under medical direction and nurse coordination that provides a variety of inpatient and home care for individuals who are terminally ill and their family members; provides calming and accommodating care that meets the special needs arising from the variety of stresses experienced during the final phases of illness, death, and grieving (e.g., emotional, physical, social, economic, and spiritual).
References in periodicals archive ?
Traditions Hospice of South Houston is a subsidiary of Traditions Health Care Holding Company LLC, a leading home health and hospice provider in Texas.
At the end of life it is so important for those suffering to know there is a hospice within their community which is totally focused on providing excellent care.
Based in Plano, Texas, Hospice Source is a full service, national provider of respiratory therapy, medical equipment, and Hospice DME IT solutions focused exclusively on the hospice market.
Harbor Light Hospice provides these educational resources to assist potential clients during a challenging time.
The Hospice PUF data allow for many types of analyses to be performed, including comparisons between providers, states, and national benchmarks.
Since opening nearly six years ago, Bobby's Hospice has:
The Institute of Medicine (IOM)'s Dying in America Report recommends a hospice approach because it is patient-centered, family-oriented and evidence-based, but in the IOM report there are many testimonials from families who could not get hospice until very late.
The third problem is the scarcity of hospice care specialists.
Overall, hospices in Wales receive less Government funding as a proportion of expenditure than those in England and Scotland.
Hospice hairdresser Karen will have the honour of shaving Helen's head.
Ian Leedham, a senior fundraiser for the children's hospice, said: "Annual donations such as these from the Freemasons and other groups are a vital source of income to enable us to carry out our worK in the community at what is a difficult time for families.
St David's Hospice Care in Newport said it has seen the total number of patients rise dramatically to over 3,000 in 2012-213 compared to 750 in 1992-94.