horse

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horse

(hôrs)
n.
a. A large hoofed mammal (Equus caballus) having a short coat, a long mane, and a long tail, domesticated since ancient times and used for riding and for drawing or carrying loads.
b. An adult male horse; a stallion.
c. Any of various equine mammals, such as the wild Asian species Przewalski's horse or certain extinct forms related ancestrally to the modern horse.
v.intr.
To be in heat. Used of a mare.
adj.
1. Of or relating to a horse: a horse blanket.
2. Mounted on horses: horse guards.
3. Drawn or operated by a horse.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Drug slang A regional term for heroin
Infectious disease A hoofed ungulate mammal—Equus ferus caballus—that may be associated with certain infections through occupational or recreational exposure—e.g., Actinobacillus spp, anthrax, brucellosis, cryptosporidiosis, equine morbillivirus, glanders, leptospirosis, rabies, salmonellosis, yersiniosis
Psychology See Equestrian therapy, Hippotherapy
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
One day, riding in the Pampas with a very respectable "estanciero," my horse, being tired, lagged behind.
The Gauchos are well known to be perfect riders The idea of being thrown, let the horse do what it likes; never enters their head.
"But that's the Grand Duke, and I want the commander in chief or the Emperor," said Rostov, and was about to spur his horse.
Having passed the Guards and traversed an empty space, Rostov, to avoid again getting in front of the first line as he had done when the Horse Guards charged, followed the line of reserves, going far round the place where the hottest musket fire and cannonade were heard.
I know I'm not much account; but I'm the only horse in all the Land of Oz, so they treat me with great respect."
You may be an imitation of a horse, but you're a mighty poor one."
The reader will recollect that, on distributing his forces when in Green River Valley, Captain Bonneville had detached a party, headed by a leader of the name of Matthieu, with all the weak and disabled horses, to sojourn about Bear River, meet the Shoshonie bands, and afterward to rejoin him at his winter camp on Salmon River.
"There is no reason at all," said he quietly, "except the fashion; they say that a horse would be so frightened to see the wheels of his own cart or carriage coming behind him that he would be sure to run away, although of course when he is ridden he sees them all about him if the streets are crowded.
"Because these horses are not to be sold," was the reply.
"A famous horse! a mad rider!" growled the captain.
For a few minutes they heard the panting of the tired little horse and the drunken shouting of the peasants.
Snodgrass, as the equestrian came trotting up on the tall horse, with his hat over his ears, and shaking all over, as if he would shake to pieces, with the violence of the exercise, 'pick up the whip, there's a good fellow.' Mr.