horror

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hor·ror

(hor'ŏr),
Dread; fear.
[L.]

horror

Intense fear, revulsion, or dread caused by seeing or hearing something that is terrifying, shocking, or perceived to be life-threatening to the individual or to others.
References in periodicals archive ?
"I would say that Pakistan got their team combination horribly wrong during the Asia Cup," the Express Tribune quoted Sohail, as saying.
Last November, Stephen Gallagher, 35, of Blackhall Colliery, County Durham, was sentenced to two-and-a-half years in jail after their 14-week-old daughter died when he tried to change her nappy while "horribly drunk".
I think on this occasion he has got that horribly wrong."
The Australian economy, particularly the personal sector and housing, is horribly over-borrowed.
As Ron emerged in his old teddy boy suit, wordlessly announcing that he had chosen to stay with Tina rather than seize his long-delayed chance to run off with Nina, the whole thing took on the air of a Victoria Wood sketch gone horribly, horribly wrong.
He said: "My feeling is that it's just horribly unprofessional and an extremely bitter pill to swallow that, at the biggest tournament in the sport, we're having to deal with this.
Summary: The moment a circus performance went horribly wrong for a Ukrainian lion tamer has been caught on video by an American tourist.
Her complete faith as producer and actress in Phil Traill's quirky romantic comedy is horribly misplaced.
Well worth watching, if only for the distinct possibility it might all go horribly, horribly wrong.
For the non-scootering set, the best way to join in the festivities is to catch the bands playing afterward, including awesome indie rockers Radio America, whose song "Mahabharata" is horribly, horribly catchy.
Chronicling explorers, missionaries, and archaeologists ranging from Viking settlers and Renaissance conquerors to modern-day scientists, The Frozen Ship also reflects upon morbid global cultural fascination with expeditions that went horribly wrong, and the powerfully romanticized appeal of the frozen polar landscapes and the drive to plant flags in ice.