horn

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horn

 [horn]
1. a pointed projection such as the paired processes on the head of various animals, or other structure resembling them in shape.
2. an excrescence or projection shaped like the horn of an animal.
anterior horn of spinal cord the horn-shaped configuration presented by the anterior column of the spinal cord in transverse section; called also ventral horn of spinal cord.
cicatricial horn a hard, dry outgrowth from a scar, often scaly and occasionally osseous.
dorsal horn of spinal cord posterior horn of spinal cord.
lateral horn of spinal cord the horn-shaped configuration presented by the lateral column of the spinal cord in transverse section.
posterior horn of spinal cord the horn-shaped configuration presented by the posterior column of the spinal cord in transverse section; called also dorsal horn of spinal cord.
sebaceous horn a hard outgrowth of the contents of a sebaceous cyst.
ventral horn of spinal cord anterior horn of spinal cord.
warty horn a hard, pointed outgrowth of a wart.

horn

(hōrn), [TA]
Any structure resembling a horn in shape.
Synonym(s): cornu (1)
[A.S.]

horn

(hôrn)
n.
1. One of the hard, usually permanent structures projecting from the head of certain mammals, such as cattle, sheep, goats, or antelopes, consisting of a bony core covered with a sheath of keratinous material.
2. A hard protuberance, such as an antler or projection on the head of a giraffe or rhinoceros, that is similar to or suggestive of a horn.
3.
a. The hard smooth keratinous material forming the outer covering of the horns of cattle or related animals.
b. A natural or synthetic substance resembling this material.

horn adj.
horn′ist n.

horn

(hōrn) [TA]
1. A hard projection; consisting largely of compact keratin, tapering to a point, usually paired, on the head of certain mammals.
2. Any structure resembling a horn in shape.
Synonym(s): cornu (1) .
[A.S.]

horn

A rare, age-related local overgrowth of the horny layer of the skin so that a short, cylindrical, horn-like protrusion occurs. Cutaneous horns are easily removed but the base may be found to be cancerous.

horn

(hōrn) [TA]
Any structure resembling a horn in shape.
Synonym(s): cornu (1) .
[A.S.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Louis Symphony, jazz hornist Tom Varner, Hollywood recording legend Jim Decker and many others.
Since Julius Watkins was the only jazz French hornist who had his own band back then (in 1955 when I moved to NYC and began playing with Mingus, Julius and I began to play together and were the two improvising French hornists of the era).
The IHS Advisory Council unanimously voted for Natal, Brazil as the location of the 49th International Horn Symposium based on the brilliant presentation of host Radegundis Tavares and the multi-year efforts of Marcus Bona and his cadre of Brazilian hornists who promise that this will be a Symposium not to be missed.
I hope to see you in Natal, but if you are not able to go, I look forward to seeing you another time, at a concert, workshop, or symposium, wherever hornists gather.
There will be lots of opportunities to play in ensembles and workshops, hear master hornists demonstrate their skills, and purchase your new instrument from our exhibitors!
Begun in 1980 by hornist Elliott Higgins, founder of the International Horn Competition of America, it has connected the horn community through fellowship and learning.
The songs themselves, as mentioned in the foreword, are from Austrian and German traditions, so they will not be as familiar to some hornists; I confess that I only knew three of 29--Still, Still, Still; Lo, How a Rose e're Blooming; and Silent Night.
This year's guest artist will be Elizabeth Freimuth, principal hornist of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra.
The annual Oklahoma Horn Day was held on April 16 for middle and high school hornists; clinicians were Mat Evans (Bethany Nazarene University), Evan Chancellor (East Central OK State University), and Genevieve Craig (Director of Bands, Lindsey Public Schools), all of whom are present or former students of Eldon's at OU.