hormone-receptor complex

hormone-receptor complex

hormone specifically bound to its receptor either on the plasma membrane or intracellularly.
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When a protein or peptide hormone binds to its receptor, a hormone-receptor complex is formed.
This hormone-receptor complex then binds to DNA, causing activation or repression of gene expression and, ultimately, a specific biological response.
The binding of a hormone to its receptor can be understood as a chemical reaction that is governed by the law of mass action, where the hormone (H) and receptor (R) are the reactants and the hormone-receptor complex (HR) is the product:
D] is the equilibrium dissociation constant (a measure of affinity) and [H], [R], and [HR] are concentrations of hormone, receptor, and the hormone-receptor complex, respectively.
In the nucleus, the hormone-receptor complex when bound to DNA stimulates or represses the expression of certain genes, thereby affecting protein synthesis.
2] or estrogenic mimics bind to ERs, receptor dimerization and recruitment of transcriptional comodulators are initiated, and the hormone-receptor complex binds to the estrogen response element (ERE) and subsequently regulates transcription in an ordered and cyclic manner (Metivier et al.
Once combined, the hormone-receptor complex stimulates processes such as ovulation, sperm production, the emergence of adult sexual characteristics, and changes in blood chemistry.
Each hormone has a "high affinity" for its particular receptor, and upon binding together like a "lock and key", the hormone-receptor complex signals genetic expression in the cell nucleus, whether it be to "turn on" or "turn off" biological activity.