hormonalization

hormonalization

Endocrinology Hormonal manipulation of ♂ or ♀ somatic or behavioral characteristics

Patient discussion about hormonalization

Q. does the growth hormone have side effects and what are they?

A. Yes, it does, and not a few. They include, among others, pain in the joints, carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetes, pain at the injection site, problems with the thyroid gland, ear problems and many others. You may read more about side effects of growth hormone treatment (called Mecasermin or Somatropin) here: http://www.drugs.com/ppa/mecasermin.html

Q. what is the effect of hormones during pregnancy on a woman's temper?

A. Hormonal changes during pregnancy can indeedn cause mood changes, starting from anxiety or agitations to developing major clinical symptoms of depression. Pregnancy affects each woman differently.

Q. What types of hormonal changes caused by fibromyalgia? Fibromyalgia affects hormones because I feel pain in my back bone. What types of hormonal changes caused by fibromyalgia?

A. Have you ever checked your back pain with a doctor? It may or may not be due to fibromyalgia. Low serotonin levels, low growth hormone levels, and low levels of neuropeptide Y, a component of the feel-good hormone neurotransmitter norepinephrine have been associated with fibromyalgia. Elevated levels of substance P acts as a neurotransmitter and signals the body to experience pain. These pains have also been observed in the spinal cord of fibromyalgia patients.

More discussions about hormonalization
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike transvestites for whom sex and gender do not coincide with the social pattern, leading to a series of bodily transformations (hormonalization, for example) (39), in the experience of the woman living with BSS, the lean, muscular body, with bulging veins, big belly, without cheekbones is what does not fit the norm.
But DES has an earlier and quite important and complex history in which it figures in what has been described as the "hormonalization" of women.(7) The regulation of menopause, rather than pregnancy, was its first site of intervention.(8) In addition, the usefulness of DES as a treatment for menopause was a matter of medical dispute.
On the hormonalization of women, see Nelly Oudshoorn, Beyond the Natural Body: An Archeology of Sex Hormones (New York: Routledge, 1994).