horizontal

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horizontal

 [hor-ĭ-zon´tal]
1. parallel to the plane of the horizon.
2. spreading from one individual to another; see horizontal transmission.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

horizontal

(hôr′ĭ-zŏn′tl, hŏr′-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or near the horizon.
2.
a. Parallel to or in the plane of the horizon.
b. At right angles to a vertical line.
3. Occupying or restricted to the same level in a hierarchy: a horizontal study of verbal ability; a horizontal transfer by an employee.
4. Medicine Of or relating to transmission of infection by contact with or physical proximity to an infected individual or fomite.
n.
Something, such as a line, plane, or object, that is horizontal.

hor′i·zon·tal′i·ty (-zən-tăl′ĭ-tē), hor′i·zon′tal·ness n.
hor′i·zon′tal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even with the growing popularity of slow-speed, high-torque shredders as primary processors, tubs and horizontal grinders remain essential in the growing wood waste and construction and demolition debris market.
Horizontals have a potential advantage when it comes to control over material flow and they may have an edge when it comes to safety, says Hundt.
it signed a partnership agreement with German builder Schwabische Werkzeugmaschinen GmbH, which specializes in the aforementioned dual- and quad-spindle machining centers, both horizontals and verticals (e.g., the twin-spindle vertical BAS03-22, which is fitted with 20-hp, 17,500-rpm spindles, twin trunnion tables for a 3.5second workpiece change, and a work envelope of 300 x 400 x 400 mm).
PHOTO : for horizontals. Bumper fascia is molded from Himont's HiFay TPO.
The Irish-born artist, who was raised in England, relies on deceptively simple compositions based on iterations of horizontal and vertical blocks of heavily layered color, a style he amusingly labels "Druid Minimalism," and for much of his career he has veered toward an abstraction reminiscent of, among others, Agnes Martin and Robert Ryman.
Each of Yeardley Leonard's canvases consists of about ten to twenty horizontal stripes of color, plainly hand painted (no taped edges) in semitranslucent coats.