horehound


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hore·hound

, hoarhound (hōr-hownd),
Marrubium vulgare (family Labitae); bitter principle is marrubium, a volatile oil. A compound alleged to have expectorant properties and often found in cough drops and other patent medicines.
[O.E. hār, hoary, + hūne, herb]

horehound

(hôr′hound′)
n.
1.
a. An aromatic plant (Marrubium vulgare) in the mint family having leaves with white pubescence and numerous white flowers in axillary cymes, native to Eurasia. The leaves yield a bitter extract used in flavoring and as a cough remedy.
b. A candy or preparation flavored with this extract.
2. Any of several similar plants in the mint family, especially Ballota nigra.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of the research was in vitro evaluation of antioxidant potentials (neutralization of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydroxyl (OH) and nitroso (NO) radicals, determination of reducing ability of ferric reducing potential (FRAP), and inhibition of lipid peroxidation) followed by preliminary chemical characterization of the horehound extract through quantification of the content of total phenolics and flavonoids.
The leaves from horehound are used to make cough lozenges and flavour liqueurs and were once used to clean milk pails, the dried flowers were used as floating wicks on oil lamps.
uniflorus; Northern water horehound or bugleweed; Seasonal pool, creek banks, meadows; Infrequent; C = 5; BSUH 17919.
Buffalograss (Buchloe dactyloides), common horehound (Marrubium vulgare), live oak, Texas persimmon (Diospyros texana), ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei), honey mesquite, western soapberry (Sapindus soponaria), and salt cedar (Tamarix) were at lower elevations and along creekbeds.
THE DEAD WEATHER I Cut Like A Buffalo This comes from Jack White and Alison Mosshart's album Horehound. It's a great track, dark, brooding and White also shows a nifty knack for pounding the drums.
Many of these introduced plants have become weeds, including St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), plantain (Plantago lanceolata), white horehound (Marrubium vulgare), mullein (Verbascum thapsus), chickweed (Stellaria media), nettle (Urtica dioica), shepherd's purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris), dandelion (Taraxacum officinalis) and yellow dock (Rumex crispus) (Lamp 1983).
*We were surprised that Dead Weather's album, Horehound, is good.
Try elder flowers and a cough syrup of elder berries, or try an equal parts blend of mullein flower, coltsfoot, comfrey leaf and horehound. Again, take one teaspoon of the blend per one cup of water.
While we now have reason to accept honey as a valid therapeutic agent, we now need research to validate (or not) the efficacy of horehound, wild cherry bark, coltsfoot, or other traditional anti-tussive botanicals.
In the next breath, Sierralupe lauds even more that spring to mind - teas with horehound for cough, stinging nettle for asthma and allergies, cinnamon for circulation, blueberry leaves for regulating blood sugar.
Notches in the wheels formed 'drops' such as hardtack and horehound candy.
Bring on, therefore, Farrer's charcoal lozenges, Ford's pectoral balsam of horehound (for coughs, flu and asthma), or Dr Townsend's sarsaparilla pills (nature's own remedy, they dubbed it), or Cupiss's constitution balls.