hopeless

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hopeless

Terminal care Futile. See Medical futility.
References in classic literature ?
I must try to make a man of him," Dominic answered hopelessly.
The longer I thought over this strange adventure, the more hopelessly tangled the mystery became: and it was a real relief to meet Arthur in the road, and get him to go with me up to the Hall, to learn what news the telegraph had brought.
Among other volumes of verse on the top shelf of the bookcase, of which I used to look at the outside without penetrating deeply within, were Pope's translation of the Iliad and the Odyssey, and Dryden's Virgil, pretty little tomes in tree-calf, published by James Crissy in Philadelphia, and illustrated with small copper-plates, which somehow seemed to put the matter hopelessly beyond me.
You are a hopelessly disappointing person," she declared a little pitifully.
I am bound to say I agree with you, Thomson," the General declared, a little hopelessly.
Wingrave made an effort to drag himself a yard or two towards the bell, but collapsed hopelessly.
Then, as soon as he recovered his breath a little, he shook the snow out of his boots and out of his left-hand glove (the right-hand glove was hopelessly lost and by this time probably lying somewhere under a dozen inches of snow); then as was his custom when going out of his shop to buy grain from the peasants, he pulled his girdle low down and tightened it and prepared for action.
For once our volatile and exuberant spirits are hopelessly subdued.
In this richest of diggings it cost out by their feverish, unthinking methods another dollar was left hopelessly in the earth.
Here are men bent on performing feats of running, without having legs; and women, hopelessly barren, living in constant expectation of large families to the end of their days.
Poor Felicity used to get hopelessly furious over it.
Despite his political success, Swift was still unable to secure the definite object of his ambition, a bishopric in England, since the levity with which he had treated holy things in 'A Tale of a Tub' had hopelessly prejudiced Queen Anne against him and the ministers could not act altogether in opposition to her wishes.