hoodia


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Related to hoodia: Hoodia gordonii

hoodia

(ho͝od′ē-ə)
n.
1. Any of various succulents of the genus Hoodia native to desert areas of southwest Africa.
2. A preparation made from any of these plants, especially from the species Hoodia gordonii, purported to suppress the appetite after being ingested.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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The appetite suppressing qualities of the Hoodia cactus have been known to scientists in the developed world since 1937 when a Dutch anthropologist studying the San indigenous people in the Kalahari desert near what is now the South Africa-Namibia border, noted that they sucked on the Hoodia plant as an appetite suppressant and thirst quencher during long hunts.
He said: "If it's just growing naturally hoodia is quite sparse but we are growing it in controlled horticulture.
To keep hunger and thirst at bay, the San chew on pieces of the Hoodia cactus which acts like an appetite suppressant.
For instance, he referenced the rise and fall of the once popular weight loss ingredient hoodia/'Hoodia is one example from a few years ago that burned hot and fast until it died.
The dietary supplement "Hoodia Gordonii Gold Capsules" has been found to contain Sibutramine and Phenolphthalein which are prohibited in the UAE.
This fact sheet covers 24 ingredients found in these products, including African mango, beta-glucans, chromium, garcinia, green tea, hoodia, and raspberry ketones.
One of the better examples of this is the Hoodia case involving Canadian pharmaceutical company, Phytopharm, which secured a patent for the active ingredient of the Hoodia plant, an appetite suppressant used for centuries by the Basarwa people.
IDAHO and OHIO can be spelled out from HOODIA (A Dictionary of the Flowering Plants and Ferns, 7th edition; a genus of plants); and OHIO and IOWA can be spelled out from OHIOWA (Times Index Gazetteer; a small town in Nebraska).
The San people (among the oldest communities in southern Africa) historically acquired traditional knowledge on the use of Hoodia gordonii, a moist plant found in the Kalahari desert, which the San have customarily consumed to limit hunger on their lengthy, tiring journeys.
Gray may include handfuls of baby spinach, cacao powder, maca, a few drops of folic acid, a little camu camu, some hoodia, schisandra powder, lycium powder, vitamin C, chia seeds, and a handful of goji berries, which she says are great for energy and the brain.
Hoodia gordonii (Masson) Sweet ex Decne is a cactus-like succulent species from the Apocycnacaea family used traditionally among the San tribe of southern Africa to suppress appetite when away on long hunting trips (6).