honorific


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honorific

[L. honorificus, honor-making]
To convey honor upon a person, esp. while writing or speaking about an individual.
See: pejorative
References in periodicals archive ?
Lecat is careful to pronounce certain words in the African ways, such as pronouncing each m in Mma, the honorific used for women, which adds to the flavor of the story.
Of the fifteen, only twelve will be of an age to vote in the conclave for a new pope; the remainder are given honorific appointments.
Firstly, the auxiliary (r)are is used not only for the formation of passive but also in cases of spontaneity, possibility, and honorific forms.
Some of the honorific doctoral titles strike me as less as an honor and more of a warning to avoid their writings.
A non-profit organization specifically created for this purpose, as well as an honorific membership organization, the IOM was chartered in 1970 as a component of the National Academy of Sciences.
The presentation took place in the context of the current visit of Professor Schreiber, who holds the honorific academic title Eoe1/4Y[pounds sterling]HabilEoe1/4ao to the Sultanate.
Bush's recent comments, saying it acknowledges Bush's use of the honorific ''Mr.
The music and drama auditorium has a conventional stage and is partly lined with timber for acoustic enhancement, but this also brings an honorific quality to the principal performance space.
Jeweller Anna Gordon, who made pieces for the stair, was also commissioned to make a clock for the reading room and door panels in silver and gold, underscoring the strong honorific quality of the interior.
According to the Diario de Noticias daily, a police source said the official became infuriated when a young policeman told him to stop shouting, and addressed him by using the familiar form of "you", without the honorific "sir".
Granite was chosen as an honorific material to indicate that the building is in government service.
TOKYO - Education minister Nariaki Nakayama on Wednesday asked a government panel on the Japanese language to come up with guidelines on the use of the honorific and polite form of speech, known as ''keigo'' in Japanese, to counter its widespread misuse, ministry official said.