honorific


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honorific

[L. honorificus, honor-making]
To convey honor upon a person, esp. while writing or speaking about an individual.
See: pejorative
References in periodicals archive ?
As older people are generally seen as occupying a higher status, using honorifics implies an age separation.
Pope Paul VI reformed use of the honorific in 1968, reducing the number of ecclesiastical honors from 14 to three.
Sri' Pranab breaks free of colonial honorifics on Bihar visit
The social interactant's request that the participant address him or her without honorific is inappropriate to start with, so complying with this personal preference is perceived as an endorsement of socially inappropriate behavior.
I think that this can be explained by the fact that slurs are the other side of the coin of what we might call honorific titles, such as 'sir' or 'miss.
Calling those who have earned doctorates "doctor" is a fine honorific in schools and other settings.
Peculiar Stories" is inspirational and thought provoking evidence that she really deserves this honorific label.
O'Donnell also points out that the words and deeds in his professional career (as opposed to his role as senior fellow at TPPF, which he notes was "an unremunerated honorific post") "clearly reflect [his] positive views about the role of research in the university and the role of the research university in higher education in America.
April 15 News): Perhaps lawyers' use of the honorific "Esquire" is neither frivolous nor needless.
Scholars of Japanese, English, language instruction, and linguistics report findings on such matters as the indexing stance in interaction with the Japanese desu/masu and plain forms, advanced learners' honorific styles in emails and telephone calls, emulating and resisting pragmatic norms, refusals in Japanese telephone conversations, the comprehension of indirect opinions and refusals in second-language Japanese, and developing the use of Japanese sentence-final particles through email correspondence.
Besides, I am accused of committing crime because I uttered the word 'sayin' (an honorific title in Turkish which literally means esteemed).
According to the Washington Post, efforts early in Bush's term to send a letter were stymied by an intense debate over whether to use an honorific such as "his excellency" to address Kim.