mesquite

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Related to honey mesquite: screwbean mesquite

mesquite

see prosopis juliflora.
References in periodicals archive ?
elator consists of sparsely vegetated areas that may or may not include honey mesquite, including heavily grazed land, disturbed areas, and areas along fencerows adjacent to cultivated fields and roads.
Honey mesquite seedling growth and 2,4,5-T susceptibility as influenced by shading.
An association between honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) and the Texas kangaroo rat has been well documented (Bailey 1905; Blair 1954; Carter et al.
05) between species composition at burrows and random sites with American badgers selecting burrows dominated by honey mesquite and bufflegrass (Pennistum ciliare).
Nutritive composition of green and ripe pods of honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa, Fabaceae).
In what appear to be later successional stands, canopy cover of the overstory tree layer is 60 to 90 percent with cedar elm, tepeguaje (Leucaena pulverulenta), western soapberry (Sapindus drummondii), sugarberry, honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa), anacua (Ehretia anacua) the dominant species (Tables 2 and 3).
neomexicana listed in Appendix) is characterized by loamy, gravelly alluvium with intermingling of several microhabitats consisting of various combinations of trees (saltcedar Tamarix aphylla, Fremont cottonwood Populus fremontii), shrubs (creosotebush Larrea tridentata, honey mesquite Prosopis glandulosa, whitethorn acacia Acacia constricta, desert willow Chilopsis linearis, ocotillo Fouquieria splendens, four-wing saltbush Atriplex canescens, sage Salvia), Russian thistle (Salsola kali), Spanish dagger (Yucca torreyi), cacti (purple prickly pear Opuntia violacea, tasajillo Opuntia kleiniae, cholla Opuntia imbricata), and grasses (fluffgrass Erioneuron pulchellum, chino gramma Bouteloua breviseta, tobosa Hilaria mutica).
Mexican ash (Fraxinus berlandieriana), honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa), Texas sugarberry (Celtis laevigata), lotebush (Ziziphus obtusifolia), and cedar elm (Ulmus crassifolia) were among the few woody species that lost most or all of their leaves in mid-December.
In formerly grazed woodlands, overstory honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) trees grew an average of 2.
This may be because honey mesquites were the most abundant plants available to lizards.