homopteran

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homopteran

(hō-mŏp′tər-ən)
n.
Any of numerous plant-feeding insects belonging to the former order Homoptera, such as the cicadas, aphids, and scale insects, usually having membranous forewings and including all hemipterans not in the order Heteroptera.

ho·mop′ter·an, ho·mop′ter·ous (-tə-rəs) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

homopteran

any insect of the suborder Homoptera (order HEMIPTERA), in which the forewings are of a uniform nature throughout. Examples include plant bugs, froghoppers, aphids, etc.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
multiplicata in southwestern of Coahuila feeds on ants, homopterans, and hemipterans as the numerically most common food items, but that volumetrically, beetles represented more than 40% of the stomach content followed by larvae of lepidopterans and homopterans.
Diets of female eastern pipistrelles consisted predominantly of Homopterans and Coleopterans (ca.
Studies of ant-homopteran mutualisms focus primarily on protection from predators as the critical means by which homopterans benefit (Buckley 1987).
Homopterans (27.1%) also were common, with leafhoppers (Cicadellidae) accounting for all of this order.
Females more often fed on large prey bundles prepared by the host (21% of feeding events) than did males, who were never observed feeding on prey bundles, but rather fed on small prey (tiny dipterans and homopterans) caught on the spiral strands, but unnoticed by the host.
Also in Indiana, Brack (1985) found dipterans, trichopterans, coleopterans (including the Asiatic oak weevil), lepidopterans, homopterans, hymenopterans, neuropterans, and plecopterans represented, in decreasing order of importance, in the diet of this species.
It has a generalized diet that includes nectar, insects, seeds, carrion, and honeydew secreted by Homopterans (Woodworth 1908, Horton 1918, Mallis 1942, Flanders 1943, Creighton 1950, Markin 1970a).
Hemiptera were split into suborders Heteroptera and Homoptera, because the digestive systems of most homopterans have filter chambers that concentrate nitrogenous compounds (Borror et al.
Across all week, the diet was dominated by coleopterans (59.3% volume), hemipterans (23.3% volume) and homopterans (12.4% volume).
Finally, the toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis strains, some of them isolated from homopterans, was evaluated using coarse bioassays.
Homopterans and dipterans were the dominant groups within the arthropod assemblage [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 5 OMITTED].
Most homopterans on branches were Cicadellidae followed by Aphididae.