homoplastic


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homoplastic

 [ho″mo-plas´tik]
1. pertaining to homoplasty.
3. denoting organs or parts, as the wings of birds and insects, that resemble one another in structure and function but not in origin or development.

ho·mo·plas·tic

(hō'mō-plas'tik),
Similar in form and structure, but not in origin.
[homo- + G. plastos, formed]

homoplastic

/ho·mo·plas·tic/ (-plas´tik)
2. denoting organs or parts, as the wings of birds and insects, that resemble one another in structure and function but not in origin or development.

homoplastic

(hō′mə-plăs′tĭk, hŏm′ə-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or exhibiting homoplasy.
2. Of, relating to, or derived from a different individual of the same species: a homoplastic graft.

ho′mo·plas′ti·cal·ly adv.

homoplastic

ho·mo·plas·tic

(hō'mō-plas'tik)
Similar in form and structure, but not in origin.
[homo- + G. plastos, formed]

ho·mo·plas·tic

(hō'mō-plas'tik)
Similar in form and structure, but not in origin.
[homo- + G. plastos, formed]

homoplastic

1. pertaining to homoplasty.
2. denoting organs or parts, as the wings of birds and insects, that resemble one another in structure and function but not in origin or development.
References in periodicals archive ?
After exclusion of these regions encompassing recombination, and homoplastic sites (136 SNPs, identified by using PAUP 4.
2]) is also a homoplastic character that allows the recognition of the members of this clade (see Table 2); however, it is ambiguous concerning the optimization in the cladogram.
For example, because the monocots represent an ancient group, there is certainly homoplastic noise in the sequence data due to nucleotide base reversals.
Farina is produced by sporophytes of a number of species within each of these cheilanthoid subclades, and is thus a homoplastic character.
Even for groups for which there is a good fossil record, the characters that are preserved may be homoplastic, or difficult to assess in terms of homology, leading to potential difficulties in accurate fossil placement.
Because previous genotyping data have demonstrated that homoplastic SNP mutations are virtually nonexistent in F.
Although the phylogeny of Compositae has recently been radically altered, the view that pollen characters are highly homoplastic continues to prevail.
If the Solifugae are closely related to the Pseudoscorpiones (as suggested above), the similarity of the testis histology and the aflagellate sperm must be seen as homoplastic.