homoplastic


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

homoplastic

 [ho″mo-plas´tik]
1. pertaining to homoplasty.
3. denoting organs or parts, as the wings of birds and insects, that resemble one another in structure and function but not in origin or development.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ho·mo·plas·tic

(hō'mō-plas'tik),
Similar in form and structure, but not in origin.
[homo- + G. plastos, formed]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

homoplastic

(hō′mə-plăs′tĭk, hŏm′ə-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or exhibiting homoplasy.
2. Of, relating to, or derived from a different individual of the same species: a homoplastic graft.

ho′mo·plas′ti·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ho·mo·plas·tic

(hō'mō-plas'tik)
Similar in form and structure, but not in origin.
[homo- + G. plastos, formed]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ho·mo·plas·tic

(hō'mō-plas'tik)
Similar in form and structure, but not in origin.
[homo- + G. plastos, formed]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The mesosternum flat ([15.sup.2]) is also a homoplastic character that allows the recognition of the members of this clade (see Table 2); however, it is ambiguous concerning the optimization in the cladogram.
That distinct pattern of geographical distribution is important because, according to Sass & Specht (2010), the apparently homoplastic morphological characters used to assign species to genera or subgenera may be useful taxonomically when geography is also taken into account.
Dietrich and Deitz (1993) listed as synapomorphies for Cicadellidae: the mesonotum exposed posteriorly, the labium not reaching the metathoracic coxae, m-cul crossvein present, metatibia with distinct long setae, tarsomere I of hind leg without cucullate setae, stemum IX and subgenital plate not fused, and abdominal tergum with divided acanthae; all of which are homoplastic characters in their analysis.
For example, because the monocots represent an ancient group, there is certainly homoplastic noise in the sequence data due to nucleotide base reversals.
The plastic resins market (the homoplastic) was originally estimated to be in the vicinity of 300 thousand M.T.
In terms of percentage of homoplastic characters, the amount of homoplasy in the behavioral characters is typical for phylogenetic datasets (Sanderson and Donoghue 1989; de Queiroz and Wimberger 1993).
In addition, certain homoplastic stem and leaf characters also provide informational value to the taxonomy of the subtribe, to delimit the main lineages of Lychnophorinae if used in combination.
Even for groups for which there is a good fossil record, the characters that are preserved may be homoplastic, or difficult to assess in terms of homology, leading to potential difficulties in accurate fossil placement.
First, the basal Early Cretaceous tyrannosauroid Eotyrannus also possesses a maxillary fenestra obscured by the lateral lamina (IWCMS 1997.550), rendering this character homoplastic. Second, Sinotyrannus possesses several unique features shared with basal tyrannosauroids such as Guanlong and Proceratosaurus, including an enlarged external naris, midline nasal crest, an anterior ramus of the maxilla, and a sharp and deep neurovascular groove on the dentary (Xu et al., 2006; Rauhut et al., 2010).
Because previous genotyping data have demonstrated that homoplastic SNP mutations are virtually nonexistent in F.