homologous


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homologous

 [ho-mol´ŏ-gus]
1. corresponding in structure, position, origin, or other aspects.
3. pertaining to an antibody and the antigen that elicited its production.

ho·mol·o·gous

(hō-mol'ō-gŭs), Corresponding or alike in certain critical attributes.
1. In biology or zoology, denoting organs or parts corresponding in evolutionary origin and similar to some extent in structure, but not necessarily similar in function.
2. In chemistry, denoting a single chemical series, differing by fixed increments.
3. In genetics, denoting chromosomes or chromosome parts identical with respect to their construction and genetic content.
4. In immunology, denoting serum or tissue derived from members of a single species, or an antibody with respect to the antigen that produced it.
5. Proteins having identical or similar functions (particularly with respect to proteins from different species).
[see homologue]

homologous

(hə-mŏl′ə-gəs, hō-)
adj.
1. Corresponding or similar in position, value, structure, or function.
2. Derived from the same species: a homologous graft.
3. Biology Similar in structure and evolutionary origin, though not necessarily in function, as the flippers of a seal and the hands of a human.
4. Immunology Relating to the correspondence between an antigen and the antibody produced in response to it.
5. Genetics
a. Relating to chromosomes that have the same morphology and linear sequence of gene loci.
b. Relating to genes that are derived from a common ancestor.
6. Chemistry Belonging to or being a series of organic compounds, each successive member of which differs from the preceding member by a constant increment, especially by an added CH2 group.

ho·mol·o·gous

(hŏ-mol'ŏ-gŭs)
1. biology Denoting organs or parts corresponding in evolutionary origin and similar to some extent in structure, but not necessarily similar in function.
2. chemistry Denoting a single chemical series, differing by fixed increments.
3. genetics Denoting chromosomes or chromosome parts identical with respect to their construction and genetic content.
4. immunology Denoting serum or tissue derived from members of a single species, or an antibody with respect to the antigen that produced it.

homologous

1. Of corresponding structure, position, function or value.
2. Having the same consecutive sequence of genes as another chromosome.
3. Belonging to a series of organic compounds of which the successive members differ by constant chemical increments.
4. Of transplantation in which the donor and recipients are of the same species.

homologous

(of organs, or structures) deriving from the same evolutionary origins. For example, the forelimb of a quadruped, the human arm, the wing of a bird, are said to be homologous (see PENTADACTYL LIMB). Usually similarities are seen best in embryonic development, and are regarded by taxonomists as indications of relationships between present-day organisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wahl (1945, 1965) argued that continued support for the homologous theory in the twentieth century was based on an explicit or implicit assumption of homology between meiotic spores and mitotic (vegetative) spores.
Although many types of aberrations are found, the more commonly observed are deletion (loss of a small segment of a chromosome usually in only one homologue) leading to loss of information, translocation (a segment of one of the two homologous chromosomes breaks and binds to the other), duplication (occurrence of the same sectors twice on the same chromosome), inversion (a particular sector is reversed in the chromosome), insertion (a new sector is inserted into the chromosome) and substitution (a certain chromosome sector is replaced with another).
Glycosidase release and fertilization of ascidian eggs fertilized with homologous and heterologous sperm % Glycosidase Eggs Sperm release Phallusia mammillata P.
Use of recombinant-derived homologous antigens, which has preceded the isolation of the virus in cell culture, should improve the sensitivity and specificity of results obtained with available heterologous antigens.
Differences in the genetic and developmental codetermination among homologous elements of the color pattern may be reflected in their correlation structure.
The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has long served as a model organism for scientific research and recent advances that now allow the knock-down of genes by RNA interference and gene replacement by homologous recombination suggest that D.
Three male students and three female students are asked to volunteer to serve as paternal and maternal members of three homologous pairs.
The results indicated that 2 of the fragments were homologous to the gene encoding the precursor of terminal protein (pTP) of adenoviruses.
one cannot use means and follow methods that could be licit in the transmission of the life of plants and animals." (1) The Church has condemned in vitro fertilization between husband and wife (homologous in vitro fertilization) because it is in itself illicit, and in opposition to the dignity of procreation and of the conjugal union.
Two somewhat conflicting theories (the homologous theory and antithetic theory) of the origin of alternating generations, specifically the origin of the sporophyte, in embryophytes (land plants) have had respective supporters for approximately a century.
Two major mechanisms are nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination.
United Kingdom-based AstraZeneca and United States-based MSD have revealed positive results from the Phase III PROfound trial of Lynparza (olaparib) in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who have a homologous recombination repair gene mutation and have progressed on prior treatment with new hormonal anticancer treatments, it was reported yesterday.