homograft

(redirected from homografts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

allograft

 [al´o-graft]
a graft of tissue between individuals of the same species but of disparate genotype; types of donors are cadaveric, living related, and living unrelated (see under transplantation). Called also allogeneic graft and homograft.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

al·lo·graft

(al'ō-graft),
A graft transplanted between genetically nonidentical individuals of the same species. Compare: autograft, xenograft.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

homograft

(hō′mə-grăft′, hŏm′ə-)
n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

allograft

A graft—organ, tissues or cells—donated from a genetically distinct individual of the same species (in humans, an individual who is allogeneic at one or more MHC loci).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ho·mo·graft

(hō'mō-graft)
Type of skin graft from another person or a cadaver, used in the treatment of burns.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

homograft

A graft taken from a member of the same species as the recipient. Compare HETEROGRAFT.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

homograft

or allograft a transplant from one individual to another individual that is of the same species but has a different genotype, and is therefore subject to rejection by the recipient as it contains foreign antigens. see HISTOCOMPATABILITY.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

ho·mo·graft

(hō'mō-graft)
Type of skin graft from another person or a cadaver used in the treatment of burns.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: FIGURE 4: Intraoperative view showing the infrarenal aortic replacement with a homograft (black arrow).
Cebotari et al., "Decellularized aortic homografts for aortic valve and aorta ascendens replacement," European Journal of Cardio-thoracic Surgery, vol.
Homograft, also known as allograft, is valve that is transplanted from another human cadaver.
Wehrs, "Homograft ossicles in tympanoplasty," The Laryngoscope, vol.
Boething et al14 had similar results and reported no surgical reintervention at 4 years for Contegra, whereas 20% homografts needed replacement over the same period.
Histological analysis confirmed the process of homograft rejection.
Some of the iatrogenic CJD cases (this included vCJD) have been traced to human cadaveric-derived dural homografts and corneal grafts (Lang, Hecjmann, Neundorfer, 1998).
The latter results indicate that the acceptance of homografts within individuals of C.
Holmes et al., "Renal homografts in patients with major donor-recipient blood group incompatibilities," Surgery, vol.
Their experiments were unable to find a significant difference in response to homografts between dizygotic and monozygotic twins, and they also observed varying levels of tolerance to the homografts in the dizygotic twins.
The unavailability of homografts has led to a rising demand for conduits for right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) reconstruction surgery.